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Blended Design and Project Based Learning: a future for engineering education
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Sunday, December 6
 

2:00pm

Registration desk opens
All delegates must be registered in order to attend AAEE2015 conference. The registration desk will be located in the main Registration area of the venue.

Sunday December 6, 2015 2:00pm - Monday December 7, 2015 5:00pm
Reception area RACV Torquay map 1

5:00pm

Welcome Reception
The AAEE2015 welcome reception is a great opportunity to connect with your fellow delegates over drinks and canapes, before the conference proceedings begin on the following day. A shuttle bus will run from local hotels to convey guests not staying at the conference vernue.

Sunday December 6, 2015 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Whites's Paddock Bistro RACV Torquay map 13 Lower level
 
Monday, December 7
 

8:00am

Registration desk opens
All delegates must be registered in order to attend AAEE2015 conference. The registration desk will be located in the Great Ocean Road Foyer of the venue.

Monday December 7, 2015 8:00am - 5:00pm
Great Ocean Road Foyer RACV Torquay map C6

9:00am

Introduction and Welcome to the Country
Welcome to the Country
Introduction by Chair of organising commitee
information about the conference program
Welcome by Deakin DVC
 

Speakers
avatar for Assoc. Prof. Aman Than Oo

Assoc. Prof. Aman Than Oo

Associate Hos (Teaching & Learning) | Faculty of Science Engineering & Built Environment | School of Engineering | Deakin Univeristy


Monday December 7, 2015 9:00am - 9:10am
Great Ocean Ballroom RACV Torquay, MAP C2

9:10am

9:30am

Welcome by Conference Chair
Speakers
avatar for Professor Guy Littlefair

Professor Guy Littlefair

Head of School | Faculty of Science Engineering & Built Environment | School of Engineering | Deakin University | | Professor Guy Littlefair is the Dean of Engineering in the Faculty of Science, Engineering and the Built Environment at Deakin University in Australia, having been appointed as chair in Engineering in January 2011. | | Professor Littlefair is internationally regarded as an expert in the field of machining, having lead teams of... Read More →


Monday December 7, 2015 9:30am - 9:40am
Great Ocean Ballroom RACV Torquay, MAP C2

9:40am

Associate Professor Aman Oo introduces 'Infogram'
Speakers
avatar for Assoc. Prof. Aman Than Oo

Assoc. Prof. Aman Than Oo

Associate Hos (Teaching & Learning) | Faculty of Science Engineering & Built Environment | School of Engineering | Deakin Univeristy


Monday December 7, 2015 9:40am - 9:50am
Great Ocean Ballroom RACV Torquay, MAP C2

9:50am

Keynote address
The importance of collaboration between the (engineering) profession and academia.

Moderators
avatar for Prof. David Lowe

Prof. David Lowe

Associate Dean (Education), The University of Sydney
Curriculum Innovation; | Linking technical + professional development; | Remote Laboratories

Speakers
avatar for Mr Geoff Hayes

Mr Geoff Hayes

Geoff has held general management, manufacturing and marketing roles in a diverse range of industries. He is currently the Program Manager, Product Delivery and Support for NULKA and Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile at BAE Systems. Nulka is an Anti-Ship Missile Decoy system invented in Australia and exported to USA and Canada. The heart of the system is a hovering rocket. A demonstration of Australia’s ingenuity! He has also worked for... Read More →


Monday December 7, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Great Ocean Ballroom RACV Torquay, MAP C2

10:30am

10:50am

| 1A | Design of Final Year Capstone Project Course to Maximise Student Learning Experience and Outcomes
“Integrated Design Project” is a final year capstone course as part of the civil engineering program offered by the Griffith School of Engineering, which integrates and builds on several other courses covered in preceding years. The main focus of this course is to encourage students to reflect and apply the knowledge and concepts learned in their previous years to solve real world structural and civil engineering problems through a major design project. The course convenor represented by a Griffith University academic staff appoints and coordinates the industry engineers and works closely with them to create the best possible student learning environment to achieve the critical learning outcomes. 

By nature, this course is fundamentally challenging. A number of issues have become evident over the last few years of offering. The students are not exposed enough to real life design project through the first few years of their degree and may face difficulties in project when more than one solution is correct. Their performance and the learning experience in this course are also affected by their prior knowledge on the fundamental courses covered in the previous years. Even though the course is taught by very experienced practising engineers, their teaching approach is understandably not compatible with that of academic staff. The overall organisation of this course is also somewhat less effective due to the involvement of the external lecturers. Due to these reasons, the students were usually not appreciating the course and the way it was delivered.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 10:50am - 11:05am
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

10:50am

| 1B | I'll believe it when I see it
Subjects concerned with the teaching of basic statics and mechanics at tertiary level institutions have seen a progressive decrease, and in some cases, the total elimination of "hands on opportunities" for students to perform experimental work in support of material presented in the lectures and in tutorials. 

The principal reasons offered for this trend is a blend of one or more of the following inter-related circumstances:

1. Increasingly large class sizes making it difficult to timetable and resource such activities

2. Competition for dedicated shared laboratory space from research needs

3. The commercially available teaching apparatus from the major vendors remains expensive

4. The availability/development of cheaper technology that "simulates" experimentation experience through videos and animation

The author has had 40 years involvement with the teaching of such material and has witnessed this progressive trend to the point where he has seen its effects on a large number of students as being nothing short of detrimental to their effective learning and better understanding of this material. 

The pendulum has swung too far away from "hands-on" opportunities for performing experimentation by students in support of inferior learning mechanisms. Technology itself must come to the rescue to swing back the pendulum to "hands on" resource-affordable experimentation opportunities to students thus improving their engagement and interest in this style of material and bringing back the fun in their learning experience.



Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 10:50am - 11:05am
Winkipop Room RACV Torquay map C4

10:50am

| 1C | Effective Technology for a Calculus Bridge Program: Bringing Education Home
The need for engineers world-wide can only be met if sufficient numbers of students of diverse ethnicity, both male and female are successfully recruited and retained in engineering fields. Engineering majors understand that calculus skills are essential for success. The Department of Mathematics at Texas A&M University implemented bridge programs to support students in their engineering calculus sequence. The program was initially offered to students who earned a B or C in the first or second engineering calculus course to strengthen their mathematical understanding and skills before they progressed to the next course. The bridge programs were one week in length, occurred just before the fall and spring semesters, and consisted of 15 hours of instruction with an online tutor. Students reported that they understood the mathematics better and felt more confident in their abilities to succeed in the next course. This success ultimately allowed them to continue in their path to engineering degrees and careers.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 10:50am - 11:05am
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

10:50am

| 1D | Design for Dissemination - Development of a Humanitarian Engineering Course for Curriculum Sharing
Humanitarian engineering education has received significant interest over the last 15 years at universities in the developed world. Numerous education initiatives and programs for humanitarian engineering and related areas including global engineering and engineering for development are available to students (such Amadei and Wallace, 2009; Campbell and Wilson, 2011, and Leydens and Lucena, 2014). These can involve a mix of traditional coursework along with a significantly levels of service-learning with students undertaking projects of various sizes and durations with community organisations on an identified need or challenge (VanderSteen et al, 2009). In Australia, service-learning projects are often incorporated into final year engineering projects, either group based or individual. These are supported by curriculum opportunities such as the EWB Challenge for first year students. However, across Australia there has been a significant gap in humanitarian engineering coursework for later year students to support service-learning opportunities.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 10:50am - 11:05am
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

10:50am

| 1F | Workshop: Building Collaborations through Storytelling while Revising Mechanics of Materials Curriculum for Implementation
Overview

This workshop is the second in a series of workshops funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation to target engineering student misconceptions. Through co-development of curricular materials for a Mechanics of Materials course, we expect to increase adoption rates and foster and strengthen collaborations among instructors. Our previous research in this area has emphasized the importance of storytelling during the initial development of a collaboration. Consequently, this workshop will not only provide an environment for instructors to develop collaborations but it will also produce tangible materials that instructors can incorporate in their classrooms. Materials created at a previous workshop (manipulatives to assist in student understanding) will be revised at this workshop.

Organizers’ Backgrounds

Grace Panther is a doctoral student in engineering conducting engineering education research at Oregon State University(OSU) in the United States. She led the design and implementation of a 1.5 day material-development workshop for instructors which inspired this research.

Dr. Devlin Montfort is an Assistant Professor at OSU. His past research focused on students’ conceptual understanding in mechanics of materials which revealed common student misconceptions. This research directly informed the creation of the original workshop.

Dr. Shane Brown is an Associate Professor at OSU. His expertise includes conceptual change and situated cognition. He has published a ranking task book for Mechanics of Materials based upon his previous research on common student misconceptions. Most recently, he has served as a program chair for the American Society for Engineering Education’s 2015 conference and exposition.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 10:50am - 12:30pm
Gaming Room RACV Torquay map C8

11:05am

| 1A | Filling in Cultural Awareness Gaps for International Senior Capstone Projects
Most undergraduate students do not have the opportunity to travel abroad and experience and develop communication skills with others cultures. However in this global world, today's engineer is likely to have to work in global international teams with colleagues from other nationalities. The challenge for many engineering curricula is how to include, in a realistic way, this global dimension and deal with the unfamiliarity with other cultures.

In the Purdue University engineering technology program an international capstone project was created to fill this need. This international capstone project builds on the existing, industry sponsored, multi-disciplinary capstone team project that is required of all students. In the international project, half of the team members are students from a non-US university. The full team works on a project proposed by companies with a global footprint in both the U.S. and in proximity to the foreign institution. Most of the global project is carried out using the full range of electronic communication tools such as email, skype, and blogs. In addition two exchange trips are made with team members traveling to their opposite foreign location. Ideally the first trip occurs near the initiation of the project for planning, organizing and conceptualization and the second at the end for final integration and demonstration for the sponsor.




Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 11:05am - 11:20am
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

11:05am

| 1B | Engaging First Year Engineering Design Students with 3D Printers - A Pilot Trial and Evaluation
Design and the application of the design process is a fundamental learning objective that all engineering students must demonstrate during their undergraduate engineering education. Engineers Australia’s Stage 1 Competency Standards make explicit mention of design and the design process in two of the sixteen mandatory ‘Elements of Competency’ (Items 1.5 & 2.3). 

At Flinders University engineering students are taught and exposed to design during every year of their undergraduate education. ‘ENGR1711 Engineering Design’ is part of the common first year and introduces students to an engineering design process coupled with hand drawing/Computer Aided Drawing (CAD) laboratories and a semester long group Design Challenge. The topic is structured such that theoretical learning is coupled with active, assessed tutorials that complement the material required for the Challenge. Student groups are encouraged to prototype their solution to a given design problem as part of the Challenge. 

In 2013 a Flinders University ‘Embedding Transition Pedagogy Principles Across the First Year Curriculum’ internal competitive grants program was initiated, offering $4000 to topic coordinators who could demonstrate how one or more of the six curriculum principles could be embedded into their first year topic. The Topic Coordinator and lead author was successful in securing a grant to purchase a 3D printer and to develop educational resources (a 3D Printing Handbook and a 50-minute lecture) to support its use, to target the principles of ‘transition’, ‘curriculum design’ and ‘engagement’. The 3D printer and accompanying resources were used in Semester 1 of 2014 for the first time.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 11:05am - 11:20am
Winkipop Room RACV Torquay map C4

11:05am

| 1C | Laboratories transformation
Laboratories provide the physical spaces for engineering students to connect with theory and have a personal hands-on learning experience. Learning space design and development is well established in many universities however laboratories are often not part of that movement. While active, collaborative and group learning pedagogies are all key words in relation to these new spaces the concepts have always been central to laboratory based learning. The opportunity to build on and strengthen good practice in laboratories is immense. 
In the 2001 review “Universities in Crisis” many references are made to the decline of laboratories. One such comment in the review was made by Professor Ian Chubb (AVCC), who in 2013, as Chief Scientist for Australia, identifies the national concern about STEM education and presents a strategic plan to address the challenges ahead. What has been achieved and changed in engineering teaching and research laboratories in this time? 

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 11:05am - 11:20am
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

11:05am

11:20am

| 1A | Collaborative learning approach to introduce computational fluid dynamics
Due to the increasing demand for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in a range of industries (mining, oil and gas, automotive, manufacturing) combined with the availability of ‘user friendly’ commercial CFD packages, the demand for engineers trained in CFD has dramatically risen. More engineering companies are now using CFD in house and it is likely that engineering graduates will, at some stage of their career, be required to either perform modelling tasks or at least be able to interpret the results of a simulation. The demand for students to receive a higher level of exposure to CFD has been evidenced by employer expectations, engineering education literature (Adair & Jaeger, 2011; Barber & Timchenko, 2011; Stern, et al., 2006; Hung, Wang, Tai, & Hung, 2005) and even student feedback. CFD is a multi-disciplinary field which requires a large amount of fundamental knowledge in mathematics, fluid mechanics, fluid dynamics and thermodynamics. Due to this complexity, some questioning remains in regards to how avoid the student perception of CFD as a black box, and promote the understanding of detailed CFD methodology and procedures (Stern, et al., 2006). As suggested by Darmofal (Darmofal, 2006), the application of active learning will contribute to enhance the conceptual understanding in conjunction with the integration of theoretical, experimental and computational techniques. This project is implemented in the Fluid Mechanics unit of the Mechanical Engineering degree at the Queensland University of Technology to introduce students in a better engaging way with the concept, terminology and process of CFD.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 11:20am - 11:35am
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

11:20am

| 1B | Transforming the Communications Engineering Laboratory Education through Remotely Accessible Software Radio Platform
The competing and often conflicting time demand on today’s university students have necessitated the development and implementation of flexible learning strategies. This has resulted in some institutions resorting to complete removal of face-to-face teaching, in favour of curriculums that are 100% online. While such learning and teaching design may be suitable for some specific courses or purposes, this approach is generally not suitable for most undergraduate university courses. An alternative is to replace traditional approaches with a considered blend of face-to-face and technology supported methods. Termed as blended learning (BL), the method uses face-to-face interaction assisted by self directed study, work placements, projects, and structured online activities using an appropriate learning management system.

As a part of its BL strategy, the University of Western Sydney (UWS) distributed 11,000 iPads to all incoming students and staff in 2013. The iPad initiative was one of the curriculum renewal strategies to incorporate more flexible study options by engaging students in new ways of learning and interacting within and outside the classroom through use of new technology. The challenge then was to generate learning materials that can take full advantage of this emerging technology. A team of Blended Learning Advisors, Designers and E-learning (BLADE) specialists were appointed and embedded within each School to address this issue. Two BL advisors and three BL designers were placed within the School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics (SCEM) in 2013.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 11:20am - 11:35am
Winkipop Room RACV Torquay map C4

11:20am

| 1C | Student Project Development based on Industry Oriented Learning: Design of a Sustainable Standalone House
Sustainable buildings (or eco-buildings) should be equipped to harvest energy and water, and include systems that provide information about supply and usage of energy and water, so that solar energy harvest systems, wind turbines and rainwater collection system are specifically designed for such a sustainable building. The system design aims for a standalone house, which includes smart grid, electric vehicles, rainwater quality control, wind power hot water system control, solar hot water system control. Most of the design and prototyping developments suit students from undergraduate and trade programs. To enable post-graduate student projects, the research goal is set to use the built-in sensors e.g. temperature sensors, humility sensors, gas meter sensors, water meter sensors, electric power meter sensors to provide local information.  Geographic information and weather forecasting information is also collected. Finally a system controller is designed in order to optimize the use of the energy sources in different conditions e.g. where, when and cost.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 11:20am - 11:35am
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

11:20am

| 1D | A Study of the understanding and attitudes of the engineering undergraduate toward plagiarism: Can attitudes be modified by in-class instruction?
The issue of plagiarism has been a growing concern within undergraduate programs. Most studies highlight why students cheat and the methods used to do so. Rather than concentrating on applying sanctions after the fact, a program of instruction was instigated at Federation University in an effort to be pro-active by teaching methods of plagiarism avoidance.

Speakers
avatar for C. Schaller

C. Schaller

Lecturer - Mechanical Engineering, Federation University
I am currently a lecturer in Mechanical Engineering at Federation University and for the past nine years have taught common core courses in addition to the mechanical courses. My research interest for the past several years has been in engineering education, in particular student teams and teamwork. | Prior to university I worked in Heavy transport and automotive, as a designer and product engineer for specialist semi-trailers and car sealing... Read More →


Monday December 7, 2015 11:20am - 11:35am
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

11:35am

| 1A | Introduction to Needs Analysis for increasing first year engineering students’ ability in conceptual design
The transition from school to university can be extremely difficult for many students. Traditional first year programmes, based around taught content, may have helped with a student’s introduction to university life but lacked the engagement and autonomy needed to stimulate effective engineering education. While the new project-based-learning paradigm gives students the contextual elements needed for more relevant project experience it may also ask too much of students in the early years of study. Increased support during early project based learning activities may well provide the answer to improving student project outputs while fostering an empathetic, user-centred design mind-set._x000D_
During 2015 we had an opportunity to involve two senior (i.e. third year) students in this programme as student-student mentors supporting the first year students in a first semester design project. Here students worked in teams of four or five on humanitarian engineering projects for the Engineers Without Borders (EWB) Challenge to develop innovative new concepts to solve specific issues faced by a particular community._x000D_
Lack of sufficient information gathering and poor problem definition are key features of conceptual design processes in the freshman year. These are greatly enhanced when new engineering students are faced with solving a problem that is remote from their physical, cultural and social identity. This initial part of the project (i.e. conceptual design) was identified by the senior students as a particular problem they experienced when they went through the process two years earlier.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 11:35am - 11:50am
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

11:35am

| 1B | Teaching for Understanding in Engineering Mathematics
Students entering tertiary institutions are often not well prepared mathematically for tertiary study. In addition, many students attempt to learn engineering mathematics by rote and never fully understand the mathematical concepts required in engineering studies. An approach to the teaching of mathematics is needed so that students can learn complex mathematical concepts with more understanding, i.e. achieve an "aha" moment with complex mathematical concepts.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 11:35am - 11:50am
Winkipop Room RACV Torquay map C4

11:35am

| 1C | Novel Design of a Renewable Energy Remote Laboratory
Current work in remote laboratories focuses on student interaction in a setting that can be at times disconnected from real world systems. Laboratories have been developed that show models of a working system, focusing on a single aspect, but very few laboratories allow the user to see the outputs of a working system that interacts with the real world as would be expected outside of a laboratory setting. It was aimed with this paper to show a design of a novel approach to building a remote laboratory that would be able to interact with a fully functional renewable energy system, and to show the students the outputs of such a system in real time. It allows for the user to be presented with information in a new context.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 11:35am - 11:50am
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

11:35am

| 1D | Humanitarian Engineering - What does it all mean?
Humanitarian Engineering is a term that has become wide spread in the last 15 years with the growth of organisations such as Engineers Without Borders and educational opportunities and initiatives in the development world. However, the term has different meanings and understandings related to types of humanitarian work undertaken and national approaches. Numerous definitions have been provided including Miller (2008), Muñoz and Skokan (2007), VanderSteen (2008) and White (2011). Hill and Miles (2012) explored student understanding of the term at one institution in the UK and concluded understandings vary and further exploration of the term is required within individual education providers to develop their educational initiatives. In Australia one definition was provided by Engineers Australia in 2011 as part of the Year of Humanitarian Engineering (in Greet 2014) but there has been little discussion or critique of this.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 11:35am - 11:50am
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

11:50am

| 1A | Teaching engineering research skills in a flipped classroom
Engineering education literature is increasingly laden with discussion of the outdated nature of the traditional lecturing style. Felder (in McCabe et. al. eds. 'Shaking the Foundations of Geo-engineering Education', CRC Press, 2012) nicely summarises the motivation for reform – steadily declining interest in engineering among high school students and chronic complaints from employers of graduates about deficiencies in critical thinking, teamwork and communication skills – and outlines some characteristics of what he calls the ‘emerging paradigm’, including curricula focused on skills as well as content, teaching styles to address a variety of learning styles and teaching dominated by active learning whereby students are actively involved._x000D_
_x000D_
Specifically with regard to teaching soft skills, Woods et el. (Chem. Engr. Ed. 2000) states process skills are “hard to define explicitly, let alone develop and assess”. The article stresses that skills should be developed via practice, that the process must be assessed as well as, or instead of, the product, and that monitoring and reflection of mental processes are key for understanding. A comparison of problem-based learning (PBL) versus traditional lecturing in an electrical engineering course demonstrated doubled learning gains from the PBL method (Yadov, J. Eng. Ed. 2011). A comprehensive review of active learning literature showed consistent improved learning outcomes across all studies of collaborative learning when compared with independent learning (Prince, J. Eng. Ed. 2004)._x000D_
_x000D_
Given this backdrop, we prioritised student-centred learning in designing our new research skills course, using teaching methods focused on active, collaborative, project-based learning._x000D_

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 11:50am - 12:05pm
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

11:50am

| 1B | Renewable Energy in the Digital Domain: Authentic Laboratory Learning Activities and Assessment
Green Electric Energy Park (GEEP) is a custom-designed state of the art laboratory for teaching and research commissioned in 2013. Along with the new technical capabilities introduced by new facilities, there was a need and an opportunity to redesign the entire process of conducting laboratory classes at GEEP. Due to the unique design of the laboratory much of the challenges were to be addressed in a novel approach however there are many valuable experiences to be shared with academics in all engineering disciplines.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 11:50am - 12:05pm
Winkipop Room RACV Torquay map C4

11:50am

| 1C | Improving Student Satisfaction Improves Learning – A Case Study in the Scholarship of Teaching
Many learning and teaching institutions use benchmarks to evaluate performance of faculty members. Three of these benchmarks are: 1) student feedback, 2) student grades, and 3) student attrition rates. This paper describes the teaching enhancements the author used to improve the student satisfaction ratings in three higher year Mechanical Engineering courses: Statics & Dynamics, Solid Mechanics & Computational Analysis, and Capstone Thermofluid Engineering. Improvements to student satisfaction and feedback rates were obtained by applying the Central Queensland University 7 principles of good teaching and other innovative practices such as the four-point strategy developed by the author.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 11:50am - 12:05pm
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

11:50am

| 1D | A National Sustainable Engineering Challenge: improving engineering curricula across Australia
There is increasing need for graduates to understand and develop solutions for a myriad of sustainability problems. With increasing pressures from climate change, energy security together with the need for reducing material/resource efficiency right through to sustainability assessment and triple bottom line reporting, young engineering graduate students are increasingly being challenged to provide a skill set that meets the challenges of a changing world. Most Australian Universities are struggling with how they can ensure that their graduates have the required set of skills and knowledge n meeting these challenges. The National Sustainability Forum held at UTS in 2013 provided convincing evidence that industry is facing major sustainability design challenges and needs graduates to be suitably equipped for this work when they leave university.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 11:50am - 12:05pm
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

12:05pm

| 1A | Effectiveness of placement and non-placement work integrated learning in developing students' perceived sense of employability
Engineering employers continue to report dissatisfaction with the skills of new graduates at the same time as employment outcomes continue to fall. Work experience is generally considered the best way to develop employability, but there are too few work placements to meet demand. Non-placement authentic work integrated learning (WIL) is an alternative but there is very little research to show if learning outcomes are equivalent. This paper compares student outcomes from placement and non-placement authentic WIL.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 12:05pm - 12:20pm
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

12:05pm

| 1B | The use of auto-tracking camera in iLectures for effective learning
Most higher education institutions use online flexible learning management system that supports the online delivery and administration of resources, communication, collaboration and assessment. One of the main objectives of online delivery of a face-to-face unit is to embed iLecture in the learning management system. The iLectures contain the audio and the PowerPoint which enable students to learn in a mobile environment and combine working part-time with university study. But the traditional iLectures do not capture any physical demonstration of lecturer and thus students face difficulties in revision. A tablet or document camera may be used to capture the hand-writing demonstration (Derting and Cox, 2008) but it looses the PowerPoint. This causes another problem of having only one in the screen while both are needed at the same time for better demonstration of the engineering concepts. In order to solve these issues, an auto-tracking camera may be used in the lecture theatre that captures white board demonstration and at the same time it embeds with the PowerPoint in iLecture. It has been reported that many students found recorded lectures as a useful learning tool because they can use it to catch up the missed lectures and also as a revision tool for exams and assessments (Karnad, 2013).

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 12:05pm - 12:20pm
Winkipop Room RACV Torquay map C4

12:05pm

| 1C | Relationship between Learning in the Engineering Laboratory and Student Evaluations
This study is built upon previous research that developed an instrument to measure the learning objectives of the laboratory across the cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains with research that investigated student evaluations of sessional laboratory demonstrators, laboratory experiments and facilities. This research highlighted the importance of laboratory work in engineering education, and the need to improve our understanding of how learning occurs in the laboratory.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 12:05pm - 12:20pm
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

12:05pm

| 1D | A modified Gardner’s Multiple Intelligence Model to address employability skills of vocational and engineering students
Education in vocational and engineering fields provides necessary technical knowledge and skills relevant to the profession. However, this education is incomplete if the students do not get the employability skills necessary to get the job or to work effectively in their profession. Gardner proposed a Multiple Intelligence Model which categorises the intelligences of learners. This paper is based on Gardner’s Multiple Intelligence Model.

Speakers
MA

M. Aftabuzzaman

Lecturer, Melbourne Polytechnic
Passionate about developing pedagogically sound, innovative, inclusive and adaptable curriculum for systematic and holistic best-practice engineering education to promote student learning experiences and deliver designated graduate outcomes.


Monday December 7, 2015 12:05pm - 12:20pm
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

12:15pm

| 1A | Improving Graduate Attributes through Project Based Learing
The study looks at how project based learning as a pedagogical method can improve students’ graduate attributes through personal development and early feedback.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 12:15pm - 11:30pm
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

12:20pm

12:20pm

12:20pm

12:20pm

12:30pm

Lunch
Monday December 7, 2015 12:30pm - 1:40pm
Great Ocean Road Foyer RACV Torquay map C6

1:30pm

1:50pm

| 2A | Development of ‘superpracs’ that appeal to both male and female high school students
This paper describes a study undertaken to transform existing hands-on laboratory activities into superpracs suitable for marketing to Year 10 to Year 12 students. A survey of global practice in marketing activities identified the best practicals, which were developed into ‘superpracs’ to appeal more to both boys and girls and present engineering careers as interesting and exciting. Engineering is one of the most male-dominated professions in the western world. Many factors contribute to low numbers of women in STEM, including perceptions of self-efficacy and cultural stereotypes. In a study of US Women in Engineering programs the best programs focused on cultural change in the faculty, while the worst focused on interventions directed at helping girls to cope.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 1:50pm - 2:05pm
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

1:50pm

1:50pm

| 2C | Looking through a glass onion : Assessing the affordances of an augmented reality experimental learning (AuREL) proposal for engineering student online experimentation
Experimental learning, traditionally conducted in on-campus laboratory venues, is the cornerstone of science and engineering education. In order to ensure that engineering graduates are exposed to ‘real-world’ situations and attain the necessary professional skill-sets, as mandated by course accreditation bodies such as Engineers Australia, face-to-face laboratory experimentation with real equipment has been an integral component of traditional engineering education. The online delivery of engineering coursework endeavours to mimic this with remote and simulated laboratory experimentation. The current implementations of both remote and simulated laboratories tend to be specified with a focus on technical characteristics, instead of pedagogical requirements.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 1:50pm - 2:05pm
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

1:50pm

| 2D | Using Reflective Writing and Textual Explanations to Evaluate Students’ Conceptual Knowledge A. Goncher
Writing is one method used to prompt students to reflect on their own thought processes. Eliciting students’ explanations in the form of text, or writing, also provides lecturers with information about students’ thinking (Goncher, Boles, Jayalath, 2014; Boles, Goncher, Jayalath, 2015).  Often in engineering courses, students adopt algorithmic problem-solving approaches without demonstrating conceptual reasoning. Adding a written, or explanatory component, to problems or questions is one approach that can elicit conceptual reasoning.

Goncher, A., Boles, W. & Jayalath, D. (2014). Using textual analysis with Concept Inventories to identify root causes of misconceptions. Proceedings of IEEE Frontiers in Education, (pp.71-74). Madrid, Spain.

Boles, W., Goncher, A., & Jayalath, D. (2015). Uncovering Misconceptions through Text Analysis. Proceedings of the 6th Research in Engineering Education Symposium. Dublin, Ireland.


Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 1:50pm - 2:05pm
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

1:50pm

| 2E | Workshop: Toward a Community-Informed Framework Characterizing the Impact of Engineering Education R&D
Funding and other resources to support engineering education scholarship are shrinking. In an environment of increased accountability, engineering education researchers and practitioners are being asked to identify the tangible impacts of their work. Unfortunately, there is a dearth of scholarship on how impact should be defined and evaluated in the context of engineering education. The engineering education community lacks a shared understanding and language around the topic of impact. As a result, many of us struggle to articulate the impact of our work to diverse audiences, and we are unable to advocate for engineering education using consistent messages. It is imperative for the global engineering education research community coalesces on a shared meaning of what impact looks like in this context – or else an inability to clearly communicate the impact of our work may lead to a loss of public support for engineering education R&D. Because the engineering education research community spans many geographic regions, it is important that the conversation around this topic engages members of worldwide engineering education community.


Monday December 7, 2015 1:50pm - 3:30pm
Spring Creek Retreat (or Bells Retreat) RACV Torquay map C7

1:50pm

| 2F | Workshop: Understanding Gender in Teamwork to Increase the Numbers of Women in Engineering
The low numbers of women in engineering remains a concern in many parts of the world, including Australasia. Prior research on students’ experiences demonstrates that classroom experiences and interactions with other students and faculty disproportionately cause negative experiences for female and other minority students and lead to attrition from engineering programs. For a variety of reasons, teamwork is one component of engineering education frequently experienced differently by women and other minority students than by male students. Given that teamwork is of central and increasing importance, it is vital that faculty members understand how to maximize gender inclusivity of their teamwork components. A study conducted over the past year examined professors’ practices and discourses surrounding teamwork and gender (among other topics): this workshop is one outcome of that study.

Presenters:
Kacey Beddoes is an Assistant Professor at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. This workshop is based on a U.S. National Science Foundation grant for which she is Principal Investigator (http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1427553). Dr. Beddoes has previously organized and led workshops at AAEE, the American Society for Engineering Education, and Frontiers in Education conferences.

Grace Panther is a doctoral student in engineering conducting engineering education research at Oregon State University. She has previously led the design and implementation of a multi-day faculty development workshop for engineering instructors. She is leading a systematic literature review of gender and teamwork (in progress), which will inform the proposed workshop.


Monday December 7, 2015 1:50pm - 3:30pm
Gaming Room RACV Torquay map C8

2:05pm

| 2A | A Multidisciplinary Project to Enhance Workplace Readiness
Engineers in the workplace regularly cooperate with specialists in other disciplines to meet the requirements of a project. However, this experience is seldom modelled in the education system; student projects often tend to focus only within the constraints of one module or discipline. This restriction therefore limits the potential for students to be truly ‘work-ready’. This paper describes how students can be better prepared for their careers, through completing a multi-disciplinary project.
Other institutes such as Central Michigan University [1] are applying the cross-discipline project concept to their undergraduate engineering programmes and are achieving successes in developing students’ capabilities and creating unique new products to meet clients’ needs. Students have been shown to improve their self-belief in their ability to perform as an engineer, through completing project-based learning [2].

Speakers
TH

Trudy Harris

Principal Academic Staff Member, Wintec


Monday December 7, 2015 2:05pm - 2:20pm
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

2:05pm

| 2B | Engineering Gen Y: An Integrated Approach
In designing a coherent engineering program, we must recognise the changing student demographics. The current gen-y student cohort are particularly responsive to a number of pedagogical approaches which work most effectively. In addition, the motive behind university education are less academically driven, but rather employability. In order to provide a valuable and relevant education experience for the Gen-Y cohort we must recognise the changing expectation of university education (for the students) and how we can best deliver the required education for their needs. Herein, we will comment on the approaches we have used in framing the development of these expectation in our first year engineering course at Macquarie University.

Speakers
avatar for Nicholas Tse

Nicholas Tse

Lecturer, Macquarie University


Monday December 7, 2015 2:05pm - 2:20pm
Winkipop Room RACV Torquay map C4

2:05pm

2:05pm

| 2D | A research agenda for design-based learning in engineering education
It is often argued that ‘design’ is an (perhaps the) essential characteristic of engineering practice; that, “Design requires unique knowledge, skills, and attitudes common to all engineering disciplines, and it is these attributes that distinguish engineering as a profession.” Hence, it is not surprising to see engineering design identified as a key element of engineering education. There are a range of pedagogical models described, badged with a range of names, that are suggested as approaches to teaching engineering design, for example: project-based learning, problem-based learning, design-based learning, conceive-design-implement-operate (CDIO), problem-oriented project-based learning, social design based learning and project-oriented, design-based learning.

Speakers
avatar for Stuart Palmer

Stuart Palmer

Associate Professor, Deakin University
I'm a professional engineering, including significant professional practice prior to joining Deakin University. I lectured in the management of engineering for 12 years, and following a period in a educational development role, I now hold an academic role in the Faculty office. I have a strong interest in engineering education, frequency domain analysis, data visualisation and social media. | Email: spalm@deakin.edu.au | Twitter: @s_palm... Read More →


Monday December 7, 2015 2:05pm - 2:20pm
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

2:20pm

| 2A | Implementation of blended learning strategies in a core civil engineering subject – an experience
The competing and often conflicting time demand on today’s university students have necessitated the development and implementation of flexible learning strategies. This has resulted in some institutions resorting to complete removal of face-to-face teaching, in favour of curriculums that are 100% online. While such learning and teaching design may be suitable for some specific courses or purposes, this approach is generally not suitable for most undergraduate university courses. An alternative is to replace traditional approaches with a considered blend of face-to-face and technology supported methods. Termed as blended learning (BL), the method uses face-to-face interaction assisted by self directed study, work placements, projects, and structured online activities using an appropriate learning management system.

As a part of its BL strategy, the University of Western Sydney (UWS) distributed 11,000 iPads to all incoming students and staff in 2013. The iPad initiative was one of the curriculum renewal strategies to incorporate more flexible study options by engaging students in new ways of learning and interacting within and outside the classroom through use of new technology. The challenge then was to generate learning materials that can take full advantage of this emerging technology. A team of Blended Learning Advisors, Designers and E-learning (BLADE) specialists were appointed and embedded within each School to address this issue. Two BL advisors and three BL designers were placed within the School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics (SCEM) in 2013.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 2:20pm - 2:35pm
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

2:20pm

| 2B | A trial flipped classroom implementation for first-year engineering
Numerous studies have found that student attention span during most lectures is roughly fifteen minutes and after this period, the number of students paying attention begins to drop off dramatically. This drop-off results in a retention loss of lecture material and can negatively impact learning outcomes. Nevertheless, the traditional didactic lecture is still seen as an efficient, but not necessarily effective, means of teaching large numbers of students. Learners, however, are “constructors of knowledge” in a variety of forms. In particular, they take an active role in forming new understandings and are not just passive receptors. The concept of active learning appeals to this activity in forming new understandings and is generally defined as any instructional method that engages students in the learning process. Traditionally styled didactic lectures may offer little in the way of active learning opportunities due to their physical environment and/or content delivery pressures. The popularity of internet resources such as Youtube and the Kahn academy has shown that readily accessible, short online videos are a valuable resource that can be used to deliver core subject material with the benefit of freeing up the lecture classes to become active learning environments. The ‘flipped’ or ‘inverted’ classroom approach attempts to bring the effectiveness of active learning to the lecture venue by shifting the onus onto students to study the relevant material, which would ordinarily be covered in lectures, at home and in their own time.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 2:20pm - 2:35pm
Winkipop Room RACV Torquay map C4

2:20pm

| 2C | Design of Learning Spaces for Engineering Education
With the re-imagining of engineering education at Deakin University an opportunity was presented with the ability to design purpose built spaces. With this development a review of leading practice educational spaces was undertaken specifically in a product development unit as well as a materials unit. Whilst both areas have different needs there were some common elements with the location of teaching aids, apparatus and experimental set-up and collaborative teaching spaces.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Paul Collins

Dr Paul Collins

Senior Lecturer, Deakin Uni


Monday December 7, 2015 2:20pm - 2:35pm
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

2:20pm

| 2D | Reconceptualising Engineering Research as Boyer's Four Scholarships
Engineering research needs to be reconceptualised from the Scholarship of Discovery to the inclusion of all Boyer’s four scholarships for it to be relevant to industry. The recent introduction of the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) has led to engineering degrees shifting to honours level qualifications around the country. This has required the explicit teaching of research principles and methods, as well as a research project. Up until now, the implementation of this has been largely modelled from research training in science degrees, where the approach to research is aligned to Boyer’s Scholarship of Discovery. However, it is argued that engineering research, and particularly engineering research in industry, is more aligned to Boyer’s Scholarship of Application and Integration. Therefore, the teaching of research to undergraduate engineering students needs to be reconceptualised as the Boyer’s four Scholarships to better equip graduates for all engineering career paths.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 2:20pm - 2:35pm
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

2:35pm

| 2A | How do we instill experience into young engineers? The use of posters as a learning tool in engineering project management
On graduation, young engineers often enter a practice-oriented field like Project Management but they may struggle to relate the theoretical concepts learnt to real applications. Lecturers frequently seek to share real-life experiences by explaining concepts in lectures or by showing project videos. Similar to case studies, the use of posters facilitates the passing of experience to young engineers in a practical and effective manner. Use of posters requires students to actively summarise, collate, organise information in a logical and intuitive manner and present them to an audience. The experience develops several skills in the cognitive domain, affective domain and psychomotor domain mapped based on Bloom’s taxonomy (Krathworl, 2002) . Prior research into the educational value of posters have been done in other fields (Deonandran et al, 2013; Bargard et al, 2014) but not specifically in Project Management.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 2:35pm - 2:50pm
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

2:35pm

| 2B | Effects of video tutorials on first year engineering student’s engagement and learning performance
New technologies offer tremendous power to assist with design and change in higher education curricula (Henson, 2010, Lai, 2012). Online educational resources have become increasingly common in recent years, as evidenced by their use in distance education and blended learning courses. In particular, one of the latest trends to appear online is the mass creation of online expository videos, including how-to, tutorial, and lecture videos (Carter et al., 2014).
As the result, the large number of free educational videos has become available on the internet. However, several previous studies (Majid et al., 2012) together with our observations found that without necessary skills to search, locate, process, evaluate and use information students often experience various information related problems, such as information overload, inability to find the needed information and to extract the important points. Also it has been demonstrated that only a minority of YouTube videos related to the particular topic are useful for teaching due to misleading content and pour quality (Yaylaci et al., 2014, Raikos and Waidyasekara, 2014, Fischer et al., 2013).
Students studding engineering generally encouraged taking initiative in problem solving and for students to learn most effectively, they need to feel involved and engaged in the learning process. This is difficult to achieve whilst delivering generic lecture content to large cohorts and during very limited tutorial sessions. With new technologies, however, it has now become possible for educators to self-create high quality online teaching-learning contents (Bae and Lee, 2015).

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 2:35pm - 2:50pm
Winkipop Room RACV Torquay map C4

2:35pm

| 2C | A Comparison and Evaluation of Aeronautical Engineering Learning Outcomes using an Airborne Flight Laboratory and a Flight Simulator Laboratory
Like many other engineering schools, the School of Engineering and Information Technology (SEIT) at the University of New South Wales (Canberra) recognised the importance of student laboratories to complement classroom theory. As Eley (1995) and others have espoused, this is because laboratory work enables students to observe the relationship between theory and practice. Importantly, students begin to gain confidence in the application of theory by observing its practical limitations. For this reason, it was decided to develop an airborne laboratory facility. An aeroplane was acquired and it was equipped with a suite of sensors and instruments that allowed many aeroplane flight parameters to be measured and recorded. Beginning in 1998, Aeronautical Engineering students and candidate pilots carried out a flight which allowed them to investigate aspects of aircraft performance, handling qualities and stability (static and dynamic) in a 1.2 hour flight. These experiments maximized the students’ experience and exposure to flight test. After an evaluation of the effort and time that academic staff required to operate the flight laboratory, in 2010 the airborne flight laboratory was discontinued. In its place there has been developed an Aviation Studio, equipped with a fixed-base flight simulator. Similar to the work carried out by Done and Neal (2012), the engineering flight simulator has been specifically designed as a versatile and practical hands-on aid to the teaching of flight mechanics and dynamics and aircraft design. Using a flight console, screens and X-Plane software, students can manipulate many aircraft characteristics.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 2:35pm - 2:50pm
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

2:35pm

| 2D | Reflections on Developing and Implementing an Advanced Engineering Project Management Course
The Advanced Engineering Project Management course was developed in 2014 by the University of Southern Queensland to assist qualified engineers to enhance their knowledge and skills in project management. It complements a number of other postgraduate engineering management courses offered by the University. This course was initially developed in 2014 for distance education by a team of three academics, each of whom has had considerable professional experience, and was delivered in that year to a small number of engineers with an interest in further developing their project management knowledge and skills. In 2015, it has been offered through both on-campus and distance education to a wider student group, including engineering technologists studying programs like the Master of Engineering Science to qualify as professional engineers, by both on-campus and distance education, with an enrolment of over 80 students. Its development and delivery, while successful, have provided a number of challenges and resulted in the learning of valuable lessons.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 2:35pm - 2:50pm
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

2:50pm

| 2A | Developing a national approach to eportfolios in Engineering and ICT
Portfolios generally and eportfolios specifically have played a role in student learning and assessment in universities for some time. The literature supports the use of portfolios in developing student ability to critically reflect on, and to articulate, university and workplace achievements that in turn aid their employability (Trevitt, Stocks & Quinlan, 2012; Shen & Ooi, 2013; Bramhall, Short & Lad, 2013). Eportfolios have been used in various disciplines such as IT (Chang & Liao, 2014), the humanities (Mossa, 2014), dentistry (Gadbury-Amyot, McCracken, Woldt & Brennan, 2014), medicine (Webb, et al, 2014), nursing (Anderson, Gardner, Ramsbotham & Tones, 2009) and teaching (Boulton, 2013). There has been some limited use of portfolios in the area of engineering (Williams, 2002; Eliot & Turns, 2011; Fielke & Quinn, 2011) and this has pointed to the place of eportfolios in enhancing engineering students’ professional skills and the development and articulation of workplace learning. This paper documents the findings of a small study into eportfolio use in engineering and ICT in Australia and reports on a proposed wider initiative to develop the first national portal for best reflective practice.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 2:50pm - 3:05pm
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

2:50pm

| 2B | Comprehensive Innovation and Practice in Teaching and Learning for the Kind of Signal Courses
‘signals and systems’, ’digital signal processing’ and ‘random signal processing’ are three important courses for electrical engineering bachelor degree students. These courses have similar features which are both strong theoretical and practical. The contents of them are tightly related each other. Main problems students in their learning process are that they feel very difficult and boring to learn with traditional teaching approach because they can not understand the meaning of some mathematical concepts and properties, such as the concept of spectrum, system group delay and so on. These problems induce them concentrate their efforts only on calculations with mathematical formula. They don’t know how to analyse and solve the problems in real world. This results in engaging a low level of learning as students gain knowledge from lecture and memorize facts and procedures in order to pass exams._x000D_
Project-based Learning(PBL) is a self-directed mode of course delivery and students gain knowledge of the course material through designing, investigating and decision making at each step of the project. It’s main advantages is that it can improve the understanding of basic concepts, to stimulate the students’ self-learning ,to encourage deep and creative learning, and to develop team work and communication skills. It is gained world-wide interest as one of instructional method and welcomed by students.
Based on ProjBL and aiming at the problems encountered in teaching process of three courses, a comprehensive innovation and practice in teaching and learning is presented in this paper based on project.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 2:50pm - 3:05pm
Winkipop Room RACV Torquay map C4

2:50pm

| 2C | Guidelines for learning and teaching of final year engineering projects at AQF8 learning outcomes
Final Year Engineering Projects (FYEP) present students, academic staff (project supervisors) and assessors (review panel), professional accreditation bodies and industry project sponsors with many challenges. Experience with coordinating and examining FYEPs and discussions with colleagues at past few AAEE conferences indicated that many engineering educators have concerns about learning and teaching approaches of FYEPs. Development of good practice guidelines which meet Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) Level 8 outcomes was therefore required. This led to a successful Australian Government grant on “Assessing Final Year Engineering Projects (FYEPs): Ensuring Learning and Teaching Standards and AQF8 Outcomes” funded by Office for Learning and Teaching.


Monday December 7, 2015 2:50pm - 3:05pm
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

2:50pm

| 2D | Can simple ideation techniques influence idea generation: comparing results from Australia, Czech Republic, Finland and Russian Federation
Many authors have reported on the unsuccessful efforts of engineering educators in enhancing creative problem solving skills of engineering students (Adams et al., 2011; I. Belski, Baglin, & Harlim, 2013; Daly, Mosyjowski, & Seifert, 2014; Douglas et al., 2012; Steiner et al., 2011; Woods et al., 1997). A number of recent studies have been devoted to successes of teaching the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ) to engineering students in order to enhance their skills in creative problem solving (Becattini & Cascini, 2013; I. Belski, 2009, 2015; Berdonosov, 2013; Busov, 2010; Dumas & Schmidt, 2015; Livotov, 2013). Moreover, it has been reported that even a simple TRIZ tool of Substance-Field Analysis (I. Belski, 2007) as well as the Random Word technique (de Bono, 1990) can improve the outcomes of students’ idea generation.
In their experiment, Belski et al. (2014) involved undergraduate students of the first year in generating ideas for a real knowledge-rich, ill-defined problem. Students from a control group generated solution ideas in silence for 16 minutes. Students in one experimental group were shown eight random words for two minutes per field. Students in the other two experimental groups were shown the names of the eight fields of Substance-Field Analysis (MATCEMIB: Mechanical, Acoustic, Thermal, Chemical, Electrical, Magnetic, Intermolecular, Biological) for two minutes per field. Exposure to both eight random words the eight fields of MATCEMIB assisted the students from the experimental groups to generate statistically significantly more solution ideas compared to the students from the control group.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 2:50pm - 3:05pm
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

3:05pm

| 2A | Outside interests, the engineering student and teamwork
Interest in research into student undergraduate project teams has been growing for some time, led by the growing use of project-based learning and more industry-integrated curriculum in engineering schools. For students to be able to learn from team-based work, the team experience, and the roles that students play within teams, must be a useful learning exercise. Current practice is for lecturers to either allow students to form their own teams or to assign teams, with little time available to give much thought into forming successful teams.

Speakers
avatar for C. Schaller

C. Schaller

Lecturer - Mechanical Engineering, Federation University
I am currently a lecturer in Mechanical Engineering at Federation University and for the past nine years have taught common core courses in addition to the mechanical courses. My research interest for the past several years has been in engineering education, in particular student teams and teamwork. | Prior to university I worked in Heavy transport and automotive, as a designer and product engineer for specialist semi-trailers and car sealing... Read More →


Monday December 7, 2015 3:05pm - 3:20pm
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

3:05pm

| 2B | From work placement to employability: a whole-of-course framework
This paper describes the framework for embedding work integrated learning across the engineering curriculum in the context of employability within a dedicated stream of project units (design and/or professional practice). This was motivated by the rapidly changing work environment globally and the need to assure and evidence not only student achievement but student confidence and ability to self-reflect, adapt and transfer their learning across the curriculum. Employability gives particular coherence to the integration, connection and reflection on these developments by students, academics and industry project supervisors. Employability is a focus across the higher education sector, nationally and internationally, including the ability to apply knowledge in context, self-awareness, self-efficacy beliefs, and the ability to reflect prior and post action, and to adapt accordingly (Yorke & Knight, 2006; Scott, Coates, & Anderson, 2008).
Our paper makes use of important prior work by Oliver (2010) in relation to ‘Benchmarking partnerships for graduate employability’, and Franz (2008), Billett (2011) and others on models and activities to support work integrated learning and employability skills effectively across a program.

While our focus in the paper is the designated stream of project units across each major of the program, Oliver has provided guiding questions for explicit identification of student capabilities, WIL experiences and evidence of learning that are guiding our development process in linking units, assessments and tools for ongoing student reflection and assurance of learning across the program.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 3:05pm - 3:20pm
Winkipop Room RACV Torquay map C4

3:05pm

3:05pm

| 2D | Mapping Quantitative Skills (QS) in First-year Engineering for on campus and distance students
Quantitative skills are defined as “the ability to apply mathematical and statistical thinking and reasoning in context” (Rylands, Simbag, Matthews, Coady and Belward, 2013). The need for the development of quantitative skills in engineering is clearly articulated in the literature and is an element of competency, “1.2 Concept understanding of the mathematics, numerical analysis, statistics and computer and information sciences which underpin the technology domain” (Engineers Australia, 2013). A project mapping the quantitative skills (QS) taught, practiced and assessed in first year STEM courses at a regional institution for blended (on campus and distance) students was undertaken in 2014. In this paper we have presented the results for one course, the Bachelor of Engineering Technology (BET).

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 3:05pm - 3:20pm
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

3:20pm

3:20pm

| 2B | Discussion session
Speakers
avatar for Ben Horan

Ben Horan

Senior Lecturer, Deakin University
Dr Horan led the design and development of the CAVE and Virtual Reality Facility within the Centre for Advanced Design and Engineering Training (CADET) at Deakin University. Ben is leading the CADET VR Lab and the Head of Discipline for Mechatronics within the School of Engineering at Deakin University. | Dr Horan has been awarded an Endeavour Research Fellowship, Australian Academy of Science – Australia Korea Foundation Early Career... Read More →


Monday December 7, 2015 3:20pm - 3:30pm
Winkipop Room RACV Torquay map C4

3:20pm

3:20pm

| 2D | Discussion session
Speakers
avatar for Chair: Dr Surendra Shrestha

Chair: Dr Surendra Shrestha

Western Sydney University
project based learning | blended learning | work integrated learning


Monday December 7, 2015 3:20pm - 3:30pm
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

3:30pm

3:50pm

| 3A | A Framework for Managing Learning Teams in Engineering Units
Team learning is an integral part of engineering education today and teamwork knowledge, teamwork skills and teamwork product have been included as one of the major components of engineering graduate outcomes in undergraduate engineering course/program curriculum. In spite of enormous research advances in theoretical aspects of learning and working in teams, anecdotal evidence suggests that most engineering academic staff are inundated by student complaints of not being able to work in a learning team due to numerous reasons. In addition to student complaints, most engineering academic staff are non-expert in team learning theories and methodologies and hence are unsure of specific learning outcomes of a teamwork, approaches to achieve those learning outcomes, suitability of team learning in a particular unit/subject, planning required for implementing teamwork, implementation and monitoring teamwork and teamwork reflection. Too often engineering academic staff include teamwork, yet without adequate preparation and with little understanding about how to use their time to achieve the greatest gains for themselves or for their students. Hence, there is a clear need for a framework for managing learning teams in engineering units.


Monday December 7, 2015 3:50pm - 4:05pm
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

3:50pm

| 3B | A comparison of web and paper based approaches for idea generation
Problem solving is one of the key skills engineers are required to have (Engineers Australia, 2011). Idea generation is a key step involved in the engineering problem solving process (Belski, 2002). Despite this, it has been reported that the engineering curricula of many institutions do not provide clear nor sufficient instruction on the process and techniques used during idea generation and consequently students do not do it well (Daly, Mosyjowski, & Seifert, 2014; Samuel & Jablokow, 2010).
Engineering students are known to be prolific users of digital technologies (Johri et al., 2014), but is not known to what extent students utilise electronic and paper based materials while studying. If students significantly utilise electronic based materials more than paper based materials, it may be viable to teach idea generation techniques via the use of web-based tools, potentially meaning these skills may be taught without utilisation of class time. If this approach is to be adopted, it is important to first determine that the quality of education would not decrease. In this case, choice of methodology is important.
It has been reported that the eight fields of MATCEMIB (Mechanical, Acoustic, Thermal, Chemical, Electric, Magnetic, Intermolecular, Biological), which are used as hints in the Substance-Field Analysis problem solving methodology, is an effective idea generation technique which can be quickly taught to students (Belski et al., 2014). It may therefore be appropriate to implement a version of Substance-Field Analysis as a web based tool to make it available for engineering students to utilise.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 3:50pm - 4:05pm
Winkipop Room RACV Torquay map C4

3:50pm

| 3C | Where (or what) to next for the High School 'PBL' STEM graduate?
Parramatta Marist, a comprehensive boys high school in Western Sydney, adopted Project Based Learning throughout the middle school curriculum in 2008; in 2010, a Problem Based Learning approach (modelled on the ‘One Day, One Problem’ approach pioneered at Republic Polytechnic, Singapore) was adopted throughout all Year 11 Preliminary Higher School Certificate (HSC) courses; in 2011, our first ‘PBL’ HSC class graduated. In 2013, a subsequent innovation, the ‘Flipped Classroom’, was adopted in Year 12 to meet the needs of the content heavy HSC syllabi and standardised exit exams. Besides increasing academic success, the intention in undertaking these fundamental shifts towards student-centred, active learning pedagogies was threefold: increase student engagement; explicitly teach and assess important ‘soft’ skills; and repackage the curricula to be more representative of typical, authentic, industry-inspired, real-world projects and problems that students may encounter when they attend university and/or join the workforce. These modes of learning have proven most suited to (and popular in) the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) subjects: this is unsurprising given their emphasis on the design process; experimentation; problem solving; portfolio process; project management and kinaesthetic approaches to learning. Moreover, these pedagogies place significant emphasis on the teaching and assessing of ‘soft’ or 'employability' skills that are almost identical to Engineers Australia’s (EA) ‘Professional and Personal Attributes’ work-related competencies. Consequently, given the PBL approach to learning and the desires of peak professional bodies like EA, what do STEM students, educated in a PBL environment, perceive universities doing to facilitate this skill development?

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 3:50pm - 4:05pm
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

3:50pm

| 3D | Perspectives of stakeholders on engineering graduate employability
This paper reports on the outcomes of a large federally funded project on graduate employability. The project explored the perspective of stakeholders from multiple disciplines: this paper focuses on outcomes for engineering stakeholders. Engineering work experience is generally considered the best way to develop employability for engineering undergraduates, however there are now insufficient placements to the increasing number of students. Employers continue to report gaps in graduate skills and attitudes, while academics resist teaching generic skills.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 3:50pm - 4:05pm
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

4:00pm

| 3E | Workshop: Benchmarking Graduate Quantitative Skills in Engineering
Quantitative skills (QS) are defined as “the ability to apply mathematical and statistical thinking and reasoning in context” (Rylands et al. 2013). The need for QS in engineering is clearly articulated as an element of competency, “1.2 Concept understanding of the mathematics, numerical analysis, statistics and computer and information sciences which underpin the technology domain” (Engineers Australia, 2013). In 2014 the Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT) funded an extension project that developed comprehensive lists of key graduate QS and mapped the first-year QS in science and engineering courses. The Bachelor of Engineering Technology (BET; Civil and Environmental), which is offered via blended modes of learning (on-campus and distance), was included in this project.
Cross-institutional benchmarking forms part of Engineers Australia accreditation, and this mapping would allow visual representation of QS across the curriculum. Detailed analysis of QS covered at each institution would identify gaps and disparities between disciplines and courses within and between institutions. However, to allow benchmarking to occur, the graduate QS need to be identified.
The list of graduate QS for the BET has been completed at one institution. To evaluate its validity, it would be invaluable to compare the list with other institutions and disciplines; and for Bachelor of Engineering (BE).
Dr Wilkes will facilitate this workshop. She has over a decade of teaching experience, was awarded an OLT Citation for her work using technology to help alleviate mathematics anxiety in a blended learning environment, and has been involved in two OLT projects examining first-year mathematics.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Spring Creek Retreat (or Bells Retreat) RACV Torquay map C7

4:00pm

| 3F | Workshop: ePortfolio Basics - How to construct a template for a project-based assessment portfolio using PebblePad
There are good reasons for students to use ePortfolios. They have been used successfully in engineering education (Blicblau, 2008; Campbell & Schmidt, 2005) and have been used to help students understand engineering graduate attributes (Palmer & Hall, 2006). Campbell and Schmidt (2005) outline a number of_benefits of ePortfolios including providing students with a way to store work so the students can identify their development over time; ePortfolios help students reflect on their development over time; and ePortfolios can showcase student work to potential employers (Goodyer & Milne, 2009).

This workshop will focus on creating a template for an assessment eportfolio that is designed to "produce evidence that relevant parties will find credible, suggestive, and applicable to decisions that need to be made...thinking in advance about how the information will be used, and by whom" (Astin et al., 2004). This would also contain certain pages that could contribute to a showcase eportfolio that can be used to represent best practices for the purpose of fostering self-reflection and peer review (Fowler, 2014) and provide expert certified evidence of their competencies to potential employers.

Presenter: Yasmine Tolentino - Blended Learning Advisor (University of Western Sydney-School of Computing Engineering and Mathematics) has been in the educational design circle for the past five years. Helped in the design, implementation, support & evaluation of using Pebblepad as an eportfolio assessment for four units in Industrial Design from 2014 to present.

Speakers
YT

Y. Tolentino

Blended Learning Advisor, Western Sydney University


Monday December 7, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Gaming Room RACV Torquay map C8

4:05pm

4:05pm

| 3B | Calculus for Kids: Engaging Primary School Students in Engineering Mathematics
The 'Calculus for Kids' program is a research project conducted through the University of Tasmania and Australian Maritime College. The project was created to provide primary school students with an application based understanding of engineering mathematics, through ICT, and ultimately encourage students into the field of engineering.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 4:05pm - 4:20pm
Winkipop Room RACV Torquay map C4

4:05pm

| 3C | Enhancing students’ learning experience using peer instruction, tutorial-lecture swapping and Improved Assessment/Feedback techniques
In the years since 2008, average enrolments in courses offered by the School of Petroleum Engineering, UNSW Australia have grown from approximately 40 students to more than 100 in 2014. This has rapid growth has created challenges for the School as the numbers of teaching staff has lagged behind the number of students. In order to ensure students continue to enjoy a high quality learning experience and to manage staff workloads, we suggest following approaches:
1) peer instruction: after delivering an important topic/concept, we give students opportunity to discuss the topic covered,
2) tutorial-lecture swapping: students are challenged to solve a tutorial question before the related topic has been discussed in the lecture, and
3) improved assessment/feedback techniques to address the issues associated with conventional techniques.

Speakers
avatar for F. Hussain

F. Hussain

Lecturer, UNSW Australia


Monday December 7, 2015 4:05pm - 4:20pm
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

4:05pm

| 3D | Accelerating Higher Degree by Research (HDR) Mechanical Engineers’ academic writing skills: an analysis of the development and outcomes of a novel visual-spatial, physical-tactile, integrated English language learning intervention, drawing on Engin
The purpose of this Participatory Action Research (PAR) research is to create, implement and evaluate a novel visual-spatial, physical-tactile, English language learning intervention, designed to align with Engineering modes of cognition, to accelerate effective research writing practices critical to supporting Engineering publication. The aim is to enable Engineers to increase their control of academic English in line with their Engineering skills, using a Systemic Functional Linguistics approach which acknowledges meaning-making as a social practice. The system also incorporates understanding of the concept of noise, evaluating learning in terms of converting noise into a positive, rather than a deficit, element of the learning model, providing students with mechanisms for finding coherence in meaning-making. This research will use a social constructivist paradigm which articulates with the PAR approach. Throughout, participants are actants in their own learning, increasing their engagement in and ownership of the meaning-making process through two PAR spirals. The research operates at the nexus of a community of inquiry and a community of practice, where the researcher, HDR participants and supervisors are equally engaged with practice and inquiry but with varied levels of experience. This experience is shaped into meaning-making through the sharing of ideas and participation (inquiry) with the student participants, thereby enabling them to become actively engaged in becoming an independent researcher in their own right by offering them both knowledge and inquiry as methodologies to achieve new skills. A combination of systematic review, diagnostic surveys, interviews, focus groups and post-intervention testing will be used as a framework.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 4:05pm - 4:20pm
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

4:15pm

| 3A| Tracing software learning and application from formal into informal workplace learning of CAD software
This paper reports on findings from a case study of an engineering course in a New Zealand university focused on the learning and application of a 3-dimensional computer-aided design (3D CAD) software, SolidWorks, as an exploration of student understandings of software literacy. It is part of a larger two-year funded research project investigating the notion of software literacy - how it is understood, developed and applied in tertiary teaching-learning contexts and how this understanding serves new learning. Software literacy incorporates understanding, applying, problem solving and critiquing software in pursuit of particular learning and professional goals (Hight et al. 2013). Our notion of software literacy is underpinned by the assumption that software is not neutral and there are important social and cultural factors that shape effective software engagement. It is an alternative to current information and digital literacy frameworks that do not go far enough in examining how lecturers and students engage with specific software applications and its implications for student learning (Livingstone et al., 2013). There is emerging evidence that although this generation may be technologically competent, many still lack the basic academic technological literacy skills needed to successfully apply software embedded and enabled technologies effectively to enhance their formal learning (Kvavik, 2005). In relation to engineering education, there is evidence for the ways different digital technologies can significantly shape how and what millennial engineers can learn (Johri, Teo, Lo, Dufour, & Schram, 2014). This has, however, not been investigated in the New Zealand context.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 4:15pm - 4:25pm
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

4:20pm

| 3B | Using classroom response systems to motivate students and improve their learning in a flipped classroom environment
Hounsell, Entwhistle, Marton, and Biggs [2005 & 1999] argue that students will approach their learning differently depending on the pedagogical models that their lecturers use. Lecturers who rely on one-way communication in lectures and tutorials, and test for declarative knowledge in end-of-course, closed-book exams tend to encourage students to take a surface or passive approach to learning. Those who require their students to interact in lectures and tutorials and problem solving projects, and who test students’ deep understanding of the topic via exercises, quizzes and continuous and authentic assessment tasks, help instil a deep or active approach to learning. There are many ways to encourage a deep approach to learning. In a featured article in the International HETL Review in 2014, Estes, Ingram and Liu, summarized and critiqued the practice and research literature that underpins one of them, namely, an emerging pedagogical model called ‘the flipped classroom’. In the 2014 AEEE conference the second author presented a first cycle of action research that studied an example of ‘flipping the classroom’ in Engineering Education. This paper reports on a second cycle of that research._x000D_
_x000D_
Biggs, J. (1999) Teaching for Quality Learning at University (pp. 165-203). Buckingham, UK: SRHE and Open University Press. _x000D_
Marton, F., Hounsell, D. and Entwistle, N. (2005). The Experience of Learning: Implications for teaching and studying in higher education. 3rd (Internet) edition Edinburgh: University of Edinburgh, CTLA. _x000D_
Estes, M., Ingram, R., & Liu, J. (2014) ‘A Review of Flipped Classroom Research, Practice, and Technologies’. IHETLR, Volume 4._x000D_
_x000D_

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 4:20pm - 4:35pm
Winkipop Room RACV Torquay map C4

4:20pm

| 3C | Shifting the Focus. Incorporating knowledge about Aboriginal engineering into main stream content
The concept of 'Aboriginal engineering' has had little exposure in conventional engineering education programs, despite more than 40,000 years of active human engagement with the diverse Australian environment. The work reported in this paper began with the premise that Indigenous Student Support Through Indigenous Perspectives Embedded in Engineering Curricula (Goldfinch, et al 2013) would provide a clear and replicable means of encouraging Aboriginal teenagers to consider a career in engineering. Although that remains a key outcome of this OLT project, the direction taken by the research had led to additional insights and perspectives that have wide implications for engineering education more generally. There has only been passing reference to the achievements of Aboriginal engineering in current texts, and the very absence of such references was a prompt to explore further as our work developed.

Speakers
avatar for Elyssebeth Leigh

Elyssebeth Leigh

Senior Lecturer, UOW
Simulation - all forms from engineering specific to role play based scenarios, virtual worlds, virtual reality, complexity and 21st century learning strategies



Monday December 7, 2015 4:20pm - 4:35pm
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

4:20pm

| 3D | Comparison of Students’ Learning Style in Engineering Mechanics and Fluid Mechanics courses
Despite the degree of progress reached in regard to different learning theories, as well as students’ approaches to learning, some aspects of students’ attitudes are still unknown. In fact, the total mark is the only indicator of the level of success or failure in the majority of current tertiary institutions. Hence, access to the details of individual student’s marks during the course of a semester, can be useful in providing a guideline for the educator or the student advisor to target particular, at-risk students. Such intermediate summative marks include assignment tasks, laboratory reports and mid-semester exam marks, which although may not follow a constant and similar trend, could assist the educator in recognising the at-risk students. Apart from the information obtained from a current course, some relationships can possibly be found between the current and the previous/prerequisite courses that the students have completed. Since the teacher or the student advisor usually does not have prior awareness of an individual student performance, detailed assessment marks, can likewise assist them in better identifying attitudes and learning styles of at-risk students.

Speakers
SS

Saeed Shaeri

Griffith School of Engineering


Monday December 7, 2015 4:20pm - 4:35pm
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

4:25pm

| 3A | Residential Schools in a First-Year Undergraduate Engineering Programme
For over 20 years, Deakin University has delivered an accredited undergraduate engineering course by means of distance education. Prior to 2004, off-campus students were not required to attend classes in person on campus. The course was designed so that the off-campus students were able to undertake all study and assessment tasks remotely from the university campus. Offering accredited domestic undergraduate engineering courses via distance education has been seen as an important strategy for helping to provide graduate domestically educated engineers to meet Australia’s current and future needs.

From 2000 the Australian accreditation management system for professional engineers, as managed by Engineers Australia, has increased its scrutiny of accredited domestic undergraduate engineering courses that were provided in distance-education mode. This led to a series of policies and recommendations for Australian universities that offer accredited engineering courses in distance-education mode: one of the recommendations was that off-campus enrolled engineering students should periodically attend some campus-based activities throughout the course.

During the 2004 accreditation review of engineering courses at Deakin University, the accreditation panel requested that mandatory campus-based activities be incorporated into the accredited undergraduate engineering course. Specifically the request was that Deakin mandate that all off-campus students enrolled in an accredited undergraduate engineering course provided by university attend in person a residential school at least once during every year of equivalent full-time study load. The accreditation panel suggested a program model for the residential school component of the course as developed by the University of Southern Queensland.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 4:25pm - 4:35pm
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

4:35pm

| 3A | Industrial Engagement for Ensuring Engineering Education Standards in Developing Countries
In developed countries, industry involvement with engineering education is a common approach for teaching and learning. For example in Australia, the John Holland Group has developed a strong relationship with Central Queensland University (CQUniversity) through their involvement in the university’s engineering co-op program. This program requires engineering students to undertake two paid, 6 months periods each, of work placement in their 3rd and 4th year study. John Holland is a consistent employer of CQUniversity undergraduates. In contrast most of the developing countries have little interaction with industry. In the developing countries, to provide quality engineering education, universities or educational institutions realize the importance of implementing practical engagement of final year engineering students into different engineering industries. In most of the developing countries it is a part of short training scheme and students used to attend the training scheme but there was no option to earn credit from this training. Nowadays, a long time practical engagement with industry, alternatively it is called industrial attachment/placement, is seen necessary as a requirement of the award of degree and students be given credit in their study program.


Monday December 7, 2015 4:35pm - 4:50pm
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

4:35pm

| 3B | Rapid Feedback for Oral Presentations
Existing literature suggests that good feedback in educational contexts can significantly improve learning processes and outcomes, if delivered in an effective way (Duncan-Howell & Lee 2007; Narciss & Huth, 2004). Yet, providing effective feedback has always been a challenge for academics. Furthermore, with the growing use of tablets like iPads and similar mobile devices, students are increasingly becoming ‘on the go’ learners or mobile learners. To this effect, mobile learning (m-learning) has become important in universities and is considered as an extension to the more traditional e-learning environments for enhancing teaching and student learning, communication efficacy, portability and the convenience of using it (Cox & Marshall 2007; Sharples 2003; Hwanga & Chang 2011). Nevertheless, there is a lack of standard set of applications or tools to support such mobile teaching and learning in e-learning environments (Lalita 2011), especially in assessing and providing timely and effective feedback.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 4:35pm - 4:50pm
Winkipop Room RACV Torquay map C4

4:35pm

| 3C | Categorising Conceptual Assessments under the Framework of Bloom’s Taxonomy
Concept inventories are designed to assess an individual’s knowledge of topics without the use of calculations. They also are designed incorporate various types of questions that assess single concepts, multiple concepts, the synthesis of concepts, or require reverse reasoning. One framework developed to categorize thinking skills in the cognitive domain is Bloom’s taxonomy (Bloom, 1956; Anderson & Krathwohl, 2001). Researchers and practitioners have developed assessments instruments using the cognitive domain of Bloom’s taxonomy in signals and systems (Ursani, Memon, & Chowdhry, 2014), and integrated the taxonomy with concept inventories (Rhodes & Roedel, 1999).

Anderson, L.W., Krathwohl, D.R. (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: A revision of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives (Complete edition). New York: Longman.

Bloom, B.S. (1956) Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, the classification of educational goals – Handbook I: Cognitive Domain New York: McKay.

Rhodes, T.R. & Roedel, R.J. (1999) The Wave Concept Inventory- A cognitive instrument based on Bloom’s Taxonomy. Proceedings of Frontiers in Education Conference, 13c1-14-18.
Ursani, A.A., Memon, A.A., & Chowdhry, B.S. (2014). Bloom’s taxonomy as a pedagogical model for signals and systems. International Journal of Electrical Engineering Education, 51(2), 162-173.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 4:35pm - 4:50pm
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

4:35pm

| 3D | Helping Academics manage students with “invisible disabilities”
The frequently invisible disabilities, such as Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), Traumatic Brain Injury, Anxiety, and Depression have similar functional consequences, which include issues with managing the pace of tasks, organisation, problem-solving, critical thinking, change and cooperative learning. These issues are core skills of engineers who must be project managers, team players, communicators, problem solvers, and able to deal with ambiguity and change.

In Australia, governments fund school-based programs for students with ASD and other learning disabilities, as well as professional development for teachers. No similar programs are offered for tertiary institutions. The transition from high school to university is difficult enough, and is further complicated by this reduction in learning support and scaffolding._
We are currently seeing a significant increase in the number of students enrolling at university who are struggling because of their “invisible disability”. Many are undiagnosed, and of those with a formal diagnosis, many choose not to formally notify the University of their disability. At the same time, students with disabilities are demanding that both University administration and Academic staff do more to actively support and assist students during their university studies. Increasingly the Academic is becoming the frontline response for these students, but they are rarely trained or equipped for this responsibility. 

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 4:35pm - 4:50pm
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

4:50pm

| 3A | A principles-evaluate-discuss model for teaching journal and conference paper writing skills to postgraduate research students
For postgraduate research students, critical thinking and communication skills are foundational to their research activity, as emphasized in the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) level 10 criteria. Despite the importance of these skills to the successful completion of a postgraduate degree, there are few formal programmes in Australia for developing a student’s skills in these areas, with most of the learning coming incidentally as students work towards their degree. Graduate centres typically focus on milestone completion, writing and learning centres provide workshops, remedial support and targeted training sessions, but much more could be done to improve these central areas of skill development. Students, however, commonly look to their supervisors for how to critique existing literature as well as write and publish original research, with the latter increasingly being viewed as the principal metric by which the impact of research is measured.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 4:50pm - 5:10pm
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

4:50pm

4:50pm

| 3C | Student Experiences of their Academic Transition from TAFE to Higher Education in Engineering
Most students who pathway from an TAFE based Associate Degree to a Higher Education based Bachelor's Degree struggle with their academic transition. TAFE based pedagogies revolve around classroom based activities involving small classes with personalised instruction and facilitation. Higher Education based pedagogies revolve around didactic instruction in a lecture tutorial mode, with large classes and generalised instruction. It is argued then that students struggle because of this academic mismatch in pedagogies, with students largely unprepared for this transition. This is particularly of concern as students that pathway to the Bachelor Honours degree get advanced standing into the second year of the course.

Speakers
LA

L. Alao

Swinburne University of Technology


Monday December 7, 2015 4:50pm - 5:10pm
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

4:50pm

| 3D | The Role of Storytelling in the Co-development of Mechanics Course Materials
Increasing the adoption of research-based theories and materials continues to be a long-standing problem within engineering education. To alleviate this issue, past research has stressed the involvement of instructors in the co-development of curricular materials. However, to have a real impact on adoption rates, we must first understand the co-development process and what components support or hinder these collaborations. Observing these collaborations revealed that storytelling is frequently used to transmit ideas in the co-development process. Specifically, we are interested in the significance of stories told by instructors during co-development, an area in which no previous research has been conducted.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 4:50pm - 5:10pm
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

5:10pm

5:10pm

| 3C | Does student engagement improve when 1:1 device technologies are used and adapted to cater for individual learning styles during online delivery of engineering courses? A. Firipis
A developing international engineering industry is dependent on competition and innovation, creating a market for highly skilled graduates from respected overseas and Australian Engineering universities. The delivery of engineering teaching and learning via blended face-to-face, problem based, research focused and online collaborative learning will continue to be the foundation of future engineering education, however, it will be those institutions who can reshape its learning spaces within a culture of innovation using 1:1 devices that will continue to attract the brightest minds. Investing in educational research that explores the preferred learning styles of learners and matching this to specifically designed 1:1 personalized web applications may be the ‘value add’ to improve student engagement. In this paper, a survey of Australian engineering education is presented and contrasted against a backdrop of internationally recognised educational pedagogy to demonstrate how engineering teaching and learning has changed over time. This paper draws on research and identifies a gap where a necessity to question the validity of 1:1 devices as the next step in the evolution of engineering education needs to be undertaken. How will teaching and learning look using 1:1 devices and will it drive student demand into engineering higher education courses. Will this lead to improving professional standards within a dynamic engineering education context? How will current and future teaching and learning be influenced by constructivism using 1:1 device technologies? How will the engineering industry benefit from higher education investment in individualised engineering education using 1:1 devices for teaching and learning?

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 5:10pm - 5:20pm
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

5:10pm

| 3D | Student Experiences of Threshold Capability Development in an Engineering Unit with Intensive Mode
Intensive mode teaching involves students engaging in facilitated learning activities or classes over more hours in a day and over fewer days than in a traditional course in the discipline. Davies (2006) reported that intensive mode teaching had been used by most Australian business schools on and offshore.

Intensive mode is used increasingly across the higher education sector. In engineering it is used for students who are mainly off-campus, for units taught off-shore by academics visiting from the main campus, and for units taught on-campus from specialists from industry. Intensive mode is being introduced in engineering at the author’s university to support interactive learning opportunities.

Previous studies have asked whether intensive mode teaching is better or worse than traditional modes (e.g., Kucsera & Zimmaro, 2010). These have used students’ perceptions, stakeholders’ opinions, students’ assessments, and comparison of measures of students’ attitudes. While these studies contribute to arguments for and against using intensive mode, curriculum designers require recommendations based on how students’ experiences of learning with intensive mode teaching can be optimised. Wlodkowski and Ginsberg (2010) used motivation as the framework for US studies of intensive mode teaching with non-traditional and adult students. In this study we explored students’ experiences of capability development in an intensive mode optional undergraduate engineering unit on critical theory of technological development, as the first phase of a larger project in which several units will be studied.

Speakers

Monday December 7, 2015 5:10pm - 5:20pm
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

5:10pm

5:20pm

5:20pm

5:20pm

 
Tuesday, December 8
 

8:00am

Registration desk opens
All delegates must be registered in order to attend AAEE2015 conference. The registration desk will be located in the Great Ocean Road Foyer of the venue.

Tuesday December 8, 2015 8:00am - 5:00pm
Great Ocean Road Foyer RACV Torquay map C6

8:45am

Welcome and Housekeeping
Speakers
avatar for Assoc. Prof. Aman Than Oo

Assoc. Prof. Aman Than Oo

Associate Hos (Teaching & Learning) | Faculty of Science Engineering & Built Environment | School of Engineering | Deakin Univeristy


Tuesday December 8, 2015 8:45am - 8:50am
Great Ocean Ballroom RACV Torquay, MAP C2

8:50am

Industry Plenary Presentation
PRESENTATION:
Historically, the energy industry can be characterised as being relatively stable and predictable. However,
the past decade has seen considerable c
hange due to global economic pressures, the rise of renewable
energy and associated technologies, including solar and battery technology, customer expectations and
regulatory challenges.
As such, the need for engineering graduates equipped with the skills
to creatively and
effectively work with companies as they transform is paramount. To foster and shape these graduates, it is
critically important that industry and academic institutions work in partnership to attract the brightest and
best engineering stu
dents.
In the context of the conference theme, partnering with industry must also extend to supporting the
development of top class design/project
-
based courses.
By leveraging strong industry and academic
institutional partnerships, we will be securing A
ustralia’s energy industry now and into the future.

Speakers
avatar for Mr Nino Ficca

Mr Nino Ficca

Bachelor of Engineering (Honours), Deakin University Graduate Diploma in Management, Deakin University Advanced Management Programme, Harvard Business School, USA
Nino has over 30 years’ experience in the energy industry, including numerous senior management roles with AusNet Transmission Group Pty Ltd (formerly SPI PowerNet Pty Ltd) including as Managing Director since 2003. Nino is a Director of Energy Networks Association Limited and a member of the National Energy Market Operations Committee.He is Chair of the Deakin University Engineering Advisory Board. Nino serves as a Member of the Australian... Read More →


Tuesday December 8, 2015 8:50am - 9:15am
Great Ocean Ballroom RACV Torquay, MAP C2

9:15am

Keynote Address
Student centered learning with simulation as a focus: The journey of an innovative simulation teaching
strategy that caters for learners bey
ond the walls of a classroom.
Almost eight years ago
,
in a classroom of first year nursing students at Central Queensland University a
teaching innovation was created and become an idea considered worth sharing. The concept would be
formalized and
called
Mask
-
Ed (KRS Simulation). This simulation technique involves the informed
professional donning of
realistic body silicone props and transforming into another person with a unique
history. The specific history enables the newly created person to become the
platform for learning and
teaching. The idea of the expert hidden behind the prop is that they can direct and control the simulation
experience without set scripts and can respond spontaneously in realistic ways to learners. Over a six year
period this te
chnique has been transferred to multiple disciplines and spread throughout the world. Despite
the extensive spread and recognition, the journey of Mask
-
Ed has not been without challenges from which
learning has occurred.
The aim of this paper is to prese
nt the journey of Mask
-
Ed. The intent is to empower educators in engineering
to think about teaching innovation that may involve risk for daring to be different. However
,
the rewards of
student engagement outweighs the risk.
The following discussion paper
will discuss the pedagogy around
the technique, the transference to multiple disciplines across the world and the new opportunities in
simulation that Mask
-
Ed has afforded. With the new opportunities, the paper will expose the pitfalls and
warnings in th
is technique. The paper will close with a collection of words from participants including
learners and academics involved in research around the technique.


Tuesday December 8, 2015 9:15am - 10:00am
Great Ocean Ballroom RACV Torquay, MAP C2

10:00am

10:20am

| 4A | Using a contextualised English support programme to assist international engineering students
ENGG1100 (Engineering Design, Semester 1) and ENGG1200 (Engineering Modelling and Problem Solving, Semester 2) are compulsory team-based courses run at The University of Queensland (UQ) for first year engineering students. These project-based courses build on teamwork, communication and collaboration skills and are assessed through reports and prototype demonstration both of which are team submissions. Each course hosts approximately 1200 students from diverse backgrounds around 20% of which identify themselves as international and English as Second Language (ESL). Many of these international students (IS) find difficulty in adapting to western culture, in particular the learning culture (Chang & Chin, 1999). Students are often accustomed to the Confucian system which focuses on transmission-based learning (lectures) and assessment through technical competence (exams) and there is little to no team work in this system (Gorry, 2011). Peer assessment in particular requires students to understand the local learning culture and demonstrate skills such as critical thinking and reflective writing which are also items not familiar to IS (Chen & Kavanagh, 2013, 2014)._

First year IS at UQ receive specific guidance during orientation week through various workshops and advising sessions but beyond this they receive little to no support to aid them specifically with overcoming transitional barriers they encounter in their studies. There is evidence that the IS enrolled in project-based courses that hinge on successful teamwork are underperforming compared to domestic students (Chen & Kavanagh, 2013) with many issues stemming from the language barrier.

Speakers
avatar for Shaun Chen

Shaun Chen

PhD Research Scholar, The University of Queensland
International Students in Engineering | First Year Engineering


Tuesday December 8, 2015 10:20am - 10:35am
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

10:20am

| 4B | Project – Based Learning (PBL) in Standard and Distant Mode Postgraduate Engineering Management Course
Research suggest that Project Based Learning (PBL) is an effective, integrative teaching methodology that engages students in their learning in both curricular and generic behavioural and contextual competencies (Wurdinger & Qureshi, 2015; Rios-Carmenado et al., 2015; Chua et al., 2014; Spalek, 2014, Tseng et al., 2013). In this research we will investigate the application of PBL in two different modes of study offered for the same subject.

Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 10:20am - 10:35am
Winkipop Room RACV Torquay map C4

10:20am

| 4C | Students’ approaches to learning through self- and peer assessments
Self-& peer assessments have been used as assessment tools by educators at various educational institutions around the world. As an assessment tool, self- & peer assessments encourage students' involvement, responsibility and contribution in the assessment process. They also allow students to focus on the development of their judgment skills. _x000D_
_x000D_
More importantly, self-& peer assessments can also be used as learning tools. As learning tools, self-& peer assessments help students in deeper learning of the concepts and the principles through exposure to a wider range of materials made available to them during self-&/or peer assessments. The mechanism on how students learn through self -& peer assessment is however, yet to be fully understood. Hence, there has been a need to understand students' behaviour and learning approaches during self-& peer assessments.

Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 10:20am - 10:35am
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

10:20am

| 4D | Text analytics visualisation of Course Experience Questionnaire student comment data in science and technology
A version of the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) has been included in the Graduate Careers Council of Australia national survey of university graduates from 1993 onward. In addition to the quantitative response items noted above, the CEQ also includes an invitation to respondents to write open-ended comments on the best aspects (BA) of their university course experience and those aspects most needing improvement (NI). These responses provide a rich source additional qualitative information that can help in understanding what students had in mind when agreeing or disagreeing with the numerical response items. The collection of textual data in large-scale surveys is commonplace, due to the rich descriptions of respondent experiences they can provide at relatively low cost, however historically these data have been underutilised because they are time consuming to analyse manually, and there has been a lack of automated tools to exploit such data efficiently.

Speakers
avatar for Stuart Palmer

Stuart Palmer

Associate Professor, Deakin University
I'm a professional engineering, including significant professional practice prior to joining Deakin University. I lectured in the management of engineering for 12 years, and following a period in a educational development role, I now hold an academic role in the Faculty office. I have a strong interest in engineering education, frequency domain analysis, data visualisation and social media. | Email: spalm@deakin.edu.au | Twitter: @s_palm... Read More →


Tuesday December 8, 2015 10:20am - 10:35am
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

10:30am

| 4E | Workshop: Student centred learning approaches to creating humanitarian engineers
The humanitarian engineering movement has gained increasing momentum in recent years with a greater focus on the responsibility of engineers to create positive social impacts in both a humanitarian context and within the engineering profession in Australia. This has led to an increase in the number of student based learning programs and opportunities centred on humanitarian engineering within universities. These include the EWB Challenge, Humanitarian Engineering Design Summits and the Humanitarian Research Program coordinated by Engineers Without Borders Australia (EWB), as well as dedicated course and project work developed within universities._x000D_
_x000D_
With this critical mass of educational opportunities comes a need to create learning pathways to promote cumulative learning for students and for a collaborative effort between universities and practitioners to define competencies and student learning outcomes required to for a humanitarian engineer. This workshop will provide participants with an opportunity to participate in a working group facilitated by EWB focusing on creating such learning pathways within Australian universities. _x000D_


Tuesday December 8, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Spring Creek Retreat (or Bells Retreat) RACV Torquay map C7

10:30am

| 4F | Workshop: Reflective Practice in 3 Domains
Reflective practice is a skill vital to professional engineers engaged with both complex problem solving and professional practice. As such, reflective practice is an important skill to teach engineering students. Increasingly, students are expected to keep a reflective journal as part of their assessable work and ongoing development. However, this often proves difficult is terms of both the structure of reflective journals and the assessment of student writing.


Tuesday December 8, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Gaming Room RACV Torquay map C8

10:35am

| 4A | Implementation of an Embedded Project-Based Learning Approach in an Undergraduate Heat Transfer Course
Griffith University has recently added the mechanical engineering discipline to its offerings in the School of Engineering. Within the school there is a vision to enhance student learning outcomes, engagement and improve retention through implementation of a student-focused learning approach. A range of project-based learning initiatives are to be implemented. These projects range from small embedded projects in traditional courses to wholly continuous assessment courses with a strong PBL focus. The third-year mechanical engineering heat and mass transfer course was developed using a design-and-build project as the central theme and was run for the first time in 2014.

Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 10:35am - 10:50am
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

10:35am

10:35am

| 4C | Distributed Constructionism in Engineering Tutorials
Constructionism – a process where knowledge is constructed through manipulation of real-world things – is a natural pedagogical approach for the engineering discipline, where 'making' is a fundamental aspect of professional practice. Yet, the pedagogy behind constructionism (see Papert 1980; Martinez & Stager 2012) is often overlooked when designing practical sessions, where the is a clear, convergent and often assessed outcome for any particular session._

Distributed constructionism (a term borrowed from Reznick 1996) extends constructionism by putting the design and running of tutorials in the hands of students, similar to student-facilitated learning (see Baker 2008; Smith & Browne 2013). 

I have built on these ideas by collaborating with honours students, who design hands-on engineering activities in courses I teach. In turn, I get students to design, develop and deliver tutorials incorporating these activities and the course theory in any given week.

Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 10:35am - 10:50am
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

10:35am

| 4D | (How) Do Professors Think About Gender When Designing PBL Experiences?
Integrating research-based teaching practices into classrooms that are student-centered is becoming more common at the university level. Specifically, Project Based Learning (PBL) has been implemented in a variety of engineering courses to provide students with a more authentic experience. Previous research has looked at the impact of PBL on student outcomes, experiences, and learning; however, the vast majority of research on PBL ignores gender. This is a problem because other research examining women’s experiences in engineering has identified teamwork (which is a core component of PBL) as a problem. Furthermore, to date, no research has examined engineering professors’ knowledge and practices related to gender and PBL through interviews with professors themselves.

Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 10:35am - 10:50am
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

10:50am

| 4A | Implementing engagement-based teaching in engineering research courses
In undergraduate research programs such as the Bachelor of Philosophy (Hons) (PhB) or various Research and Development (R&D) (Hons) degrees, there is a requirement for students to achieve First Class Honours to graduate from the program. This results in students adhering to an either self-imposed or program-required High Distinction (HD) average grade, cultivating grades-focussed behaviour in many students, as observed in the Bachelor of Engineering (R&D) (Hons) (BE (R&D)) program at the Australian National University (ANU). Focussing on grades and rote memorisation, characteristics of surface learning, is not conducive to the personal and professional development of students, and has resulted in underdeveloped reflective, interpersonal, and critical analysis skills of BE (R&D) students. This behaviour limits the growth of students and undermines the role that engineers have as innovators and leaders in today’s society.
Therefore, engagement-based teaching strategies could lead to more independent learning attitudes, facilitating deep learning, as well as student engagement with their learning and university experience. This engagement could contribute to the development of more reflective and interpersonally skilled engineering graduates, benefiting the students, the university and industry. 


Tuesday December 8, 2015 10:50am - 11:05am
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

10:50am

10:50am

| 4C | A Systematic Assessment Strategy for Grading Student Answers
Assessment is an important component in teaching where a student is assessed for his knowledge and skills in the concepts that were taught to him. Assessment strategies include written examination, viva voce, seminar, assignments, projects, etc., and are often based on assessor’s intuitive understanding of what has to be assessed, and thus remains largely subjective in nature.

Written examinations comprise questions that are of different types: objective, multiple choice, True/False, essay, problem solving and design. Marking techniques in written examinations primarily focus on the correctness of results often using numerical values. A score of 0 is offered for wrong answers, and 1 (full mark) for correct answers. (We refer to this as 0/1 marking.) Partial marking is more exhaustive and fairer than 0/1 marking since an incorrect answer can be partially correct. However, partial marking strategies are not based on formal techniques, and may not be uniformly consistent. Techniques to improve objectivity in marking include multiple choice, short answers, and modularizing large questions into multiple smaller questions minimizing their dependency on each other. However, the format and structure of the questions may not permit effective partial marking. Existing automated tools at best provide passive support to assessment and they do not explicitly model the concepts students learn in their curriculum. 

There is thus a need for providing a methodology for a more accurate method of assessing a student’s answer in written examinations.

Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 10:50am - 11:05am
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

10:50am

| 4D | Why are students choosing STEM and when do they make their choice?
The higher education sector plays an important role in encouraging students into the STEM pipeline through fostering partnerships with schools, building on universities long tradition in engagement and outreach to secondary schools. Numerous activities focus on integrated STEM learning experiences aimed at developing conceptual scientific and mathematical knowledge with opportunities for students to show and develop skills in working with each other and actively engaging in discussion, decision making and collaborative problem solving. (NAS, 2013; AIG, 2015; OCS, 2014). 
This highlights the importance of the development and delivery of engaging integrated STEM activities connected to the curriculum to inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers and generally preparing students for postsecondary success. The broad research objective is to gain insight into which engagement activities and to what level they influence secondary school students’ selection of STEM-related career choices at universities.

Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 10:50am - 11:05am
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

11:05am

| 4A | The CSU Engineering Model
Charles Sturt University is establishing a new degree in Civil Systems Engineering, with the first intake in February 2016. As the only Australian engineering program based in a Faculty of Business, we have set ourselves a goal of educating a very different type of engineering graduate, and doing so in a very different learning environment.
The course is a combined Bachelor of Technology / Master of Engineering degree. Students undertake the first 18 months of study face-to-face on our Bathurst campus. They then complete their studies through a series of four year-long work placements, while studying online for the underpinning theory.

Speakers
JM

Jim Morgan

Professor of Engineering, Charles Sturt University


Tuesday December 8, 2015 11:05am - 11:20am
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

11:05am

| 4B | High Definition Multi-View Video Guidance for Self-Directed Learning and More Effective Engineering Laboratories
Engineering students learning their very first foundational concepts require close integration of analytical skills and rigorous hands-on experience and this is recognised in most current courses, however student and staff feedback at UNSW indicates there is considerable scope for improvement. Specifically, some issues that may be improved include (i) variability in laboratory demonstrator expertise and communication skills, which are not always tailored to students’ levels of knowledge, (ii) the possibility of re-visiting laboratory guidance, particularly fundamental concepts and instructions, and (iii) opportunities for self-directed learning. From a staff perspective, there is inefficiency (demonstrators answer same question many times), a lack of narrative explaining the close integration between theory and lab, which is a problem identified by student feedback as well, and no opportunity for linking on-campus with off-campus laboratory experiences.
Many sources point to the benefits of completing preparation before each laboratory (Gregory and Di Tripani, 2012), and the challenges of the high-cognitive-load live laboratory environment, in which students attempt in short periods of time to construct new schema that bridge their analytical and practical understanding of course content (Schmid and Yeung, 2005). Patterson’s (2011) evaluation of a chemical engineering-based video laboratory manual showed that students universally found it a positive resource, preferable to a paper-based manual. Although there is significant engineering literature discussing remotely-operated laboratories (e.g. Almarshoud, 2011), there is remarkably little on self-paced video laboratory guidance (Schmid and Yeung, 2005; Dongre et al., 2013), and none describe details of how such materials should be prepared.

Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 11:05am - 11:20am
Winkipop Room RACV Torquay map C4

11:05am

| 4C | Relationships between Civil Engineering Students’ Learning Approaches and their Perception of Curriculum and Teaching Quality
Deakin University graduated its first cohort from four-year undergraduate civil engineering course/program in 2012. The internal annual Course Experience Survey, which has been running annually since 2012, targets to identify the graduating students’ learning approaches and students’ perceptions of the curriculum and teaching quality. Literature suggests that students’ learning outcomes can be achieved more efficiently when the students’ perceptions of curriculum and teaching quality are closely aligned with their learning approaches. Where the students’ approaches to learning and their perception of curriculum and teaching quality are mismatched, a series of frustrations can result for the students that may not only negatively impact their learning achievement but also their learning experience.


Tuesday December 8, 2015 11:05am - 11:20am
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

11:05am

| 4D | A Template for Change - Demonstrating how reforms in engineering education can be delivered successfully
Background 
Many employers’ organisations, industry practitioners and academics recognise that engineering education is in need of reform to meet the ever increasing complexities and challenges of today’s world. Teaching engineering science in specialist swim lanes - isolated from the essential professional skills of the “real” world is outmoded and places engineers at a disadvantage when it comes to competing for board room appointments against other professions. Employers continue to be frustrated at the effort required to convert a new graduate into a “fit for purpose” professional engineer. Industry led professional development, post-graduation, can be a mixed bag, largely dependent on the company and the personalities involved. 
Like golf, bad habits can develop at an early stage in a profession and may take many years to correct. 
This paper demonstrates that it is possible to kick start professional life with a solid, well rounded, multidisciplinary, top down, system wide, foundation – particularly when its accompanied by some early exposure to leadership and best practice in major projects. This “application led” “systems” approach offers many benefits but it does mean a distinct change in the way engineering education is delivered. Such change is notoriously difficult * but this programme shows that the necessary reforms can be achieved in spite of some very real challenges - producing engineers who can lead and integrate as well as engineer. 
*Achieving Excellence in Engineering Education: The Ingredients of Successful Change, The Royal Academy of Engineering 2012)

Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 11:05am - 11:20am
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

11:20am

| 4A | Collabor8: (Re-)Engaging female secondary cohorts in STEM subjects
Demand for skilled professionals in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) is projected to increase significantly with 75% of the fastest growing occupations requiring STEM skills (Australian Industry Group, 2013). Yet, over the past 20 years, Australia has seen significant decline in the number of secondary students - particularly girls - electing to study science and advanced mathematics (Office of Chief Scientist, 2014). 
A 2014 national STEM strategy from the Office of the Chief Scientist recommended support for `high levels of participation and success in STEM [education] for all Australians, including women, Indigenous students and students from disadvantaged and marginalised backgrounds’.
Recent research builds on previous work (e.g. Fine et al, 2010; Lyons et al, 2012; Sikora, 2012; Mills et al, 2010). Zecharia et al identify three key factors found to be influencing young women’s participation in STEM subjects:
1. Relevance of STEM to sense of identity and future aspirations.
2. Perceived actual and relative ability in STEM subjects.
3. ‘Science capital’ - or experience of STEM, including formal and informal exposure to STEM subjects and careers through the curriculum, schooling, media, culture, family and personal connections’ (Zecharia et al., 2014 p.9). 
This paper introduces Collabor8, an engineering and IT outreach program for junior female students from high schools serving low socio-economic communities. Collabor8 will test the relative importance of Zecharia et al’s three key factors for participants’ interest in STEM; intention to select STEM subjects in senior high school and tertiary study, and evaluate the chosen outreach model.

Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 11:20am - 11:35am
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

11:20am

| 4C | Gap Analysis in Concept Understanding
Teaching involves presenting concepts to students through definitions, illustrations and descriptions. However, it is often the case that there is a difference (gap) between what the student has understood about a concept and what was originally presented by the teacher. Assessment is one way of estimating this concept gap, where a student’s knowledge and skills are evaluated as objectively as possible. Quantifying concept gap continues to remain an important challenge in Engineering education. 
Techniques for assessing concept gaps have not received much attention in the field of education. The only techniques that are often used appear to be assessment based such as examination, laboratory exercises, and oral interactions in which the instructor probes the student with questions the answers to which will provide a quantitative estimate for the gap. Sometimes, the lack of confidence in the student can be viewed as a sign of the presence of a concept gap.
However, considerable attention has been paid to minimize the concept gaps. This includes motivating students, demonstrating practical applications, using game based tools, increasing interactions during lectures, making knowledge of concepts relevant to examinations, etc. 
In this paper, we argue that there is a need for a methodology for estimating concept gap objectively based on a formal model of gap analysis. We propose a methodology using an ontology of concepts from the domain of teaching for estimating the concept gap.


Tuesday December 8, 2015 11:20am - 11:35am
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

11:20am

| 4D | Success at tertiary level – analysis of factors that impact on improved performance
“Success” at tertiary level is often measured by some combination of individual unit pass rates, individual marks and entire degree completion rates. These measures are often highly influenced by students at the two ends of the performance spectrum, and can often fail to identify how the bulk of the students in the middle are performing other than passing. This paper aims to consider if there is another way to measure success. 
A number of studies have explored the extent to which these measures can predict subsequent student University performance. Wurf and Croft-Piggin consider not just ATAR but a range of other measures. Lowe and Johnston studied the correlation between students’ undergraduate performance and their responses to a range of broader questions regarding their motivation and aptitude prior to commencing their University studies. Knipe also considered whether ATAR could be used to predict the likelihood of completing degree programs. Lowe, Wilkinson & Johnston have recently analysed a large data set of university entry scores compared with yearly average marks in engineering degrees to investigate correlation between specific subject choices at high school and engineering degree performance at a gross level, and are seeking to use this paper to refine the analysis and interpretation further.

Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 11:20am - 11:35am
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

11:20am

11:35am

| 4A | Making the Change to PBL: what it takes
Problem-based learning (PBL) has become widely used in many professional education settings. In several countries in Asia (including Singapore and Malaysia) engineering educators are adopting PBL as a teaching and learning strategy. This brings with it a range of new experiences and challenges for teachers and students. Making the change to a PBL approach from a traditional approach to teaching engineering is not a simple task; it requires planning and preparation if it is going to be a truly successful transition. In a higher education context one of the most important resources is staff; in the case of PBL, staffs need to be equipped to confront the issues which arise from implementing a new curricula and instructional model.

Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 11:35am - 11:50am
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

11:35am

11:50am

11:50am

12:00pm

Lunch
Tuesday December 8, 2015 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Great Ocean Road Foyer RACV Torquay map C6

12:30pm

AGM
Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 12:30pm - 1:00pm
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

1:30pm

| 5A | First-Year Student Engineers Experience Authentic Practice with Industry Engagement
I will present a summary of a 13-week journey of individual and group work of first-year student engineers who undertake research, design, construction and operation of a scale-model mining machine. The learning outcomes of this journey are to gain an insight to engineering design, provide an introduction to the engineering systems approach, introduce working effectively in teams, and experience in time a project management.

Speakers
avatar for Saiied Aminossadati

Saiied Aminossadati

Senior Lecturer, The University of Queensland
Dr Aminossadati completed BEng in 1989, MEng in 1994 and PhD in 1999 in the field of Mechanical Engineering. He now puts his expertise to use as an educator and researcher in the School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering of the University of Queensland. He has more than 20 years of academic and industry experience and published more than 70 highly ranked Journal and conference papers. Dr Aminossadati has gained international recognition for his... Read More →



Tuesday December 8, 2015 1:30pm - 1:45pm
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

1:30pm

| 5B | Videoconferencing for teaching and learning using highly interactive pedagogy
Videoconferencing software is gaining increased prominence in provision of teaching and learning opportunities to students in communities that are remote from teachers. Various situations where videoconferencing may be used include the provision of education to students in geographically remote locations such as indigenous communities, provision of education to groups of students where sufficient numbers are not present to justify a teacher, and bringing together international experts with extremely talented students or teachers. In some cases the interaction does not depend too much on the time delay or latency in transmissions between teacher and student, whereas in other cases latency causes significant challenges to pedagogy.

Speakers
avatar for G. Moore

G. Moore

Assistant Dean (Academic Ops), Uni of Melbourne


Tuesday December 8, 2015 1:30pm - 1:45pm
Winkipop Room RACV Torquay map C4

1:30pm

| 5C | Learning beyond the curriculum: Academics’ perspectives on ICT student employability skillsorning tea
The employability of ICT graduates is declining, according to Australian Government figures [ICT skills 2014], with a large number of employers claiming they were unable to find applicants with the right mix of technical and communication skills. Recently, the Australian Federal Government Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT) set employability as a priority strategic area for Australian graduates and funded three projects around this theme. In one of these OLT projects, we set out to explain the gap between employer, graduate, academic and professional body in their expectations of employability skills in graduates. As part of this project, we developed and published an employability framework [Jollands 2015, Dacre Pool & Sewell, 2007], which helped to identify and highlight some good practices. 

In this paper, we present the research into the ICT academics and their expectations around the development of employability skills in their prospective graduates. This research entailed focus groups and interviews with academics who were asked how they were developing employability skills in their students, as well as what they were doing to maintain their own knowledge and skill currency. This can be compared with student perspectives, as well as with the attitudes of employers who were previously invited to explain what they look for when recruiting ICT graduates. 

We aim to explain the push for improved employability goals for ICT students and provide directions for further research into professional development initiatives for academics and educational developers to encourage inclusion of employability into curriculum and teaching practice.


Tuesday December 8, 2015 1:30pm - 1:45pm
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

1:30pm

1:30pm

| 5E | Workshop: Shifting Perspectives - Changing direction. Integrating Aboriginal Engineering into modern engineering curricula
All societies develop their own engineering solutions to the common problems of housing, sustenance and health. The chosen solutions are the result from combining practical actions with what is philosophically acceptable to particular social groupings. Research has demonstrated that Australian Aboriginal peoples had 40,000 years to devise and implement ways to survive and live comfortably in the wide range of climatic conditions of the Australian continent (Blainey, 2015). Clearly succeeding generations were educated about how to sustain these appropriate combinations. While the vast time scale is now generally accepted, what is less well understood is the manner in which those engineering solutions contributed to creating a stable, long-lived, diverse and sophisticated set of inter-connected national cultures. At the time of European settlement these solutions had been in place for thousands of years, but were so different from solutions familiar to the new arrivals that they were virtually invisible to the newcomers. This 'invisibility' made it difficult for succeeding generations – both newcomers and traditional occupants - to value the achievements of those Aboriginal nations. Today they are scarcely understood or seldom acknowledged, yet they continue to have the potential to teach modern engineers much about how to live on this continent sustainably.

This workshop presents the results of an OLT project focused on Indigenous Student Support Through Indigenous Perspectives Embedded in Engineering Curricula (Goldfinch, et al 2013). 

The project team comprised Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal academics from three Australian universities, and this workshop presents the results of their collaboration.

Speakers
avatar for Elyssebeth Leigh

Elyssebeth Leigh

Senior Lecturer, UOW
Simulation - all forms from engineering specific to role play based scenarios, virtual worlds, virtual reality, complexity and 21st century learning strategies


Tuesday December 8, 2015 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Spring Creek Retreat (or Bells Retreat) RACV Torquay map C7

1:30pm

| 5F | Workshop: PPIR: Introducing Professional Performance to Engineering Students

Background or Context:  

The Professional Performance, Innovation and Risk in Australian Engineering Practice program (“PPIR”) and its associated Protocol for Performance have been developed by The Warren Centre for Advanced Engineering, a not-for profit think tank located at the University of Sydney. Ashley Brinson is Executive Director at The Warren Centre. John Nurse is a member of the PPIR Advisory Board, with long-term experience in the development and coordination of PPIR training programs.

This workshop presents PPIR and the potential for PPIR-based teaching within engineering education. The aim is to assist in the development of “industry ready” graduates, with exposure to cross discipline engineering skills and cross-entity skills (owner/engineering company/construction company/equipment supplier), and exposure to a professional performance methodology and “real world” case studies.

Purpose or Goal: 

The specific outcomes from participation in this workshop are the understanding and appreciation of:

The PPIR program and its role in delivering professional performance in the Australian engineering industry and profession

The benefits of inclusion of Professional Performance (based on the PPIR Protocol) in engineering education curricula.

The application of specific learning approaches, including case studies and role play exercises.


Approach: 

Participants will take part in activities applying the principles of the PPIR Protocol for Performance: 

Simple Case study: assessment and implement of a task assigned to a graduate engineer identifying hidden complexity in the (apparently) simplest task. 

Complex Case study:  applying PPIR to a more complex real world case study, involving multiple contractual parties and consideration of technical, project and contract risk. 

Role-play:  delegation of a task, using the PPIR Protocol to ensure a common understanding and alignment between the parties. 

The activities will be undertaken in table groups. Pens and paper will be required. 

Discussion: 

The target audience is those teaching or developing curriculum content related to professional practice / management / project management. No prior knowledge is needed. The intended learning outcome is an understanding of an approach for inclusion of Professional Performance, based on the PPIR Protocol, within engineering education.



Tuesday December 8, 2015 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Gaming Room RACV Torquay map C8

1:45pm

| 5A | Debate Activity as an Effective Interactive Learning Approach for Civil Engineering Students
Conducting critical review and being a critical thinker are two major competencies expected from Civil Engineering students after graduation from university. Despite the emphasis on the above skills as the obtained graduate attributes, industry has expressed concerns about inability of students to integrate teamwork, communication, and oral presentation skills with critical thinking (investigators’ industry network and previously reported by Roy & Macchiette, 2005 and Scott 2009). Although traditional teaching techniques such as lectures and classroom quizzes and exams help students to obtain the technical knowledge and assess themselves, implementing debates in engineering subjects can effectively facilitate critical thinking as well as oral presentation skills. Vo and Morris (2006) used debate to supplement the traditional lecture by engaging the learner allowing the teachers to create an environment that supports students move away from just receiving knowledge into an atmosphere of active participation. Additionally, as highlighted by Dickson (2004), debating contemporary issues in the classroom can be an invaluable approach for encouraging critical thinking.

The research team has attempted to improve the learning experience of Civil Engineering students by introducing debate activities in engineering subjects. This will encourage the students to be active learners (against passive learner or lecture receivers). The research team considers this process as an activity (what students actually do) and not a task (the work prescribed by the teacher). In this project, a main stream civil engineering subject, namely Soil Behaviour which is a third year undergraduate subject is targeted. 

Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 1:45pm - 2:00pm
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

1:45pm

1:45pm

| 5C | Student perspectives on supporting portfolio assessment in project-based learning
Within project-based learning (PBL) courses, students often engage in peer-learning teams to solve real-world project scenarios. PBL is an ideal and increasingly common pedagogical approach in courses which develop skills in critical thinking, design, and problem solving, such as engineering. However, while the benefits of PBL are well established, substantial issues remain around efficient and effective implementation in tertiary courses; it is often difficult to achieve intended learning and teaching outcomes within reasonable academic workloads. From a student’s perspective, PBL courses may challenge them in ways they may not have experienced in more traditional learning environments; for some, it may put them outside of their comfort zone. For instructors, creating a rich PBL environment is likely to be time intensive compared with more traditional pedagogies; especially when students are new to this approach, they require substantial support to understand expectations and learn in this way.

Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 1:45pm - 2:00pm
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

1:45pm

| 5D | Educational Utilities of Virtual Laboratories for Engineering Education
The widespread availability of the Internet has led to a dramatic increase in the development of on-line learning resources for university-level education. On-line learning materials are used both to provide additional learning support for on-campus students and to allow a broader range of activities and participation models for distance education students.

For university-level engineering courses, laboratories are seen as an integral component of student learning. There has been significant recent interest in the provision of virtual engineering laboratories, either via remote Internet access to physical laboratories or through simulated laboratories, and considerable debate about the advantages and disadvantages of virtual laboratories versus physical laboratories.

The evaluation literature is very subjective in this area of virtual laboratories – individual authors tend to argue their own point of view which depends on whether they are looking to promote or refute the use of virtual laboratories. In their review, Ma and Nickerson (2006) state “The debate over different technologies is confounded by the use of different educational objectives as criteria for judging the laboratories: Hands-on advocates emphasize design skills, while remote lab advocates focus on conceptual understanding.”

The best attempt to formulate a consolidated set of learning objectives for laboratories was based on a workshop organized on behalf of ABET (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, in the USA) in 2002 (Feisel and Rosa, 2005). The workshop proposed 13 objectives in the areas of Instrumentation, Models, Experiment, Data Analysis, Design, Learning from failure, Creativity, Psychomotor Skills, Safety, Communication, Teamwork, Ethics, and Sensory Awareness.

Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 1:45pm - 2:00pm
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

2:00pm

| 5A | Volunteering for success: strategic design and implementation of the Icarus Program
The traditional model of engineering education that incorporates a series of lectures, homework sets, practical sessions and exams have been in place for quite some time, and is practiced at a large number of institutions throughout the world. Within the context of engineering education literature, the debate over the merits of design-based education and other alternatives tends to reside within a credit-based context. As seen by the results of this paper, the potential of co-curricular programs that complement curricular efforts remains an understudied and potentially exciting field of inquiry within engineering education.

Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 2:00pm - 2:15pm
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

2:00pm

| 5B | 2D versus 3D Collaborative Online Spaces for Student Team Meetings: Comparing a Web Conferencing Environment and a Video-Augmented Virtual World
Teamwork is an integral component of any engineering degree, but students often have difficulty organising team meetings outside of class times due to discrepancies in their individual study timetables as well as their family and work commitments. Rich-media synchronous online technologies such as video/web conferencing and virtual worlds can be used to help address this problem by enabling anyplace, anytime interaction, while at the same time mirroring the communication modes students will encounter in their future workplaces. However, not much is known about how these technologies compare with one another for facilitating different types of collaborative learning task and in terms of their student-perceived affordances.

Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 2:00pm - 2:15pm
Winkipop Room RACV Torquay map C4

2:00pm

| 5C | Australian Primary School Students' Perceptions of Engineering
STEM education is argued to be vital to Australia’s future prosperity (Office of the Chief Scientist, 2014). In the context of primary school education, STEM learning often focuses on science and mathematics without explicit reference to engineering. While there have been some studies conducted in the United States which have investigated primary-school-aged children’s conceptions of engineers, there is a lack of research which has been conducted regarding Australian students’ conceptions of engineers and engineering. Several studies in the United Sates have used a ‘Draw an Engineer Test’ (DAET) to capture primary students’ thinking. The DAET is an adaptation of the ‘Draw a Scientist Test’ developed by Chambers (1983).
When used in the United States, the DAET has shown that students typically view engineers as performing one of five main roles. That is, they either build, fix, create, design or drive (Knight & Cunningham, 2004). Capobianco, Diefes‐dux, Mena, and Weller (2011) describe their observations using the similar categories of, mechanic, laborer, technician and designer. For the first time in 2017 ‘Design and Technologies’ will be a mandated component of the Australian Curriculum (ACARA, 2014) and will include primary-level assessment standards for engineering activities. If Australian students display similar conceptions of engineering as American students, these conceptions will be at odds with aspects of the new Australian Curriculum and the general aims of promoting engineering through STEM education.

Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 2:00pm - 2:15pm
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

2:00pm

| 5D | Research Methodology employed in PBL Facilitation Studies
In higher education, there is both a desire and a necessity to improve the quality and effectiveness of teaching. We need to understand the characteristics of effective PBL facilitation to improve PBL implementation particularly in engineering education. The PBL facilitation research community has clearly grown and developed since its development in the 1980s. This is reflected in the growth of the number of peer-reviewed journals and the numbers of papers published relating to PBL facilitation research. For PBL facilitation research to progress, it is important for researchers to carefully select the methods they will employ. The impact of PBL facilitation studies depends upon the appropriateness and rigor of the research methods chosen

Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 2:00pm - 2:15pm
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

2:15pm

| 5A | Abstract concepts made real: A pilot study examining pedagogical approaches in thermodynamics tutorials
Thermodynamics is a core concept for mechanical engineers yet notoriously difficult. Evidence suggests students struggle to understand and apply the core fundamental concepts of thermodynamics with analysis indicating a problem with student learning/engagement. A contributing factor is that thermodynamics is a ‘science involving concepts based on experiments’ (Mayhew 1990) with subject matter that cannot be completely defined a priori. To succeed, students must engage in a deep-holistic approach while taking ownership of their learning. The difficulty in achieving this often manifests itself in students ‘not getting’ the principles and declaring thermodynamics ‘hard’

Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 2:15pm - 2:30pm
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

2:15pm

| 5C | The case study of failure analysis of engineering components: Effects on students’ employable skills, conceptual understanding, and perception
There is a need to ensure engineering students develop skills that cannot be assessed in traditional written examinations yet are essential for work as engineer; and at the same time bring realism into the study of engineering by integrating previous experience of theory and practice. This necessitates that a new approach of training should be incorporated into the traditional lecture-based engineering curriculum (Heywood, 2005; Stojcevski, and Fitrio, 2008; Holgado-Vicente, Gandia-Aguera, Barcala-Montejano, and Rodríguez-Sevillano, 2012). Such a training programme should equip engineering graduates with excellent planning, communication skills, team working ability and sound analytical and evaluation skills in line with employers’ expectations (Stojcevski and Fitrio, 2008; Anderson, Torrens, Lay, and Duke, 2007). The case study, an innovative educational teaching and learning methodology grounded in social cognitive theory (Bandura, 1997; Mayer, 2007), inspires a higher degree of students’ involvement in learning activity (Gibson, 2005; Holgado-Vicente, Gandia-Aguera, Barcala-Montejano, and Rodríguez-Sevillano, 2012). In social cognitive theory, students are expected to engage in socially mediated group problem-solving processes. The case study is implemented with students learning through engagement with engineering projects similar to that which will be encountered in professional practice (Fernandez-Samaca, and Ramírez, 2010; Holgado-Vicente, Gandia-Aguera, Barcala-Montejano, and Rodríguez-Sevillano, 2012). The incorporation of the case study into the materials selection and design curriculum is aimed at meeting the need for a new approach of engineering training which ensures the development and assessment of work-based skills that cannot be imparted and examined via traditional instructional delivery and written examinations respectively.

Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 2:15pm - 2:30pm
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

2:15pm

| 5D | The Beginning of a Scholarly Conversation on Impact in Engineering Education: A Synthesis of the Three Major Difficulties Associated with Studying Research Impact
In the social and political context of increased accountability and limited support for research and developments (R&D), engineering education researchers and practitioners are being asked to identify the tangible impacts of their work. More broadly speaking, the value of research is being scrutinized because its importance is not well understood by society, and research is often considered to have no practical significance. Unfortunately, this issue is exasperated by the dearth of scholarship on how impact should be defined, characterized, and evaluated—both in general, and in the context of engineering education. Additionally, researchers tend to express feels of disinterest or lack of expertise when asked to respond to inquiries about the impact of their work. A synthesis of scholarly literature on the difficulties associated with studying research impact reveal that researchers are not alone in their struggle to understand and articulate the impact of research.

Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 2:15pm - 2:30pm
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

2:15pm

| 5B | Discussion session
Speakers
avatar for Prof. David Lowe

Prof. David Lowe

Associate Dean (Education), The University of Sydney
Curriculum Innovation; | Linking technical + professional development; | Remote Laboratories


Tuesday December 8, 2015 2:15pm - 3:10pm
Winkipop Room RACV Torquay map C4

2:30pm

| 5A | TRIZ Evolutionary Approach in Engineering Education
Currently, learning technologies are required to transfer huge amount of knowledge within a limited time in the condition of continuous creative process. This is clearly contradictory requirements. Certain educational technologies do not meet these requirements (Gin, 2004). In traditional educational technology, there is a gap between requirements applicable to the student in the educational process, and requirements that arise later in a real professional activity. Multilevel differentiation (Balliro, 1997) means formatting groups of students on the basis of their age or skills, adapting the learning process to the cognitive abilities of each student. It allows using time for learning effectively. However, it does not solve the issues related to the obsolescence of knowledge. Project-based learning (Markham, 2011) gives insufficient attention to the creative part of a learning process and can be reduced to the creation of "templated" learning projects of similar content. One of the new methods that rapidly gain popularity in the world, is a problem - contextual study based on cases (Trowle, 2010). The Case - study method proved to be highly effective; however, it does not solve the problem of limited time to learn the necessary amount of knowledge. Analyzing the considered approaches in respect to the contradictory requirements, three ways to improve educational technologies are identified: improvement of the multi-level differentiation approach to maximize the amount of acquired knowledge; improvement of the project-based learning approach to maximize eliciting students' creative potential; improvement of the case-study method in order to minimize the time spent on learning.


Tuesday December 8, 2015 2:30pm - 2:45pm
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

2:30pm

| 5C | The Pedagogical Content Knowledge Involved in Teaching for Student-centred Learning in Engineering
Student-centredness has long been considered an ideal condition for maximising the learning of students in all disciplines, including engineering education (Heywood, 2005). Educational theory now generally accepts that the best way to give learners access to and ability to perform in the educative process is to make them an active participant in that process (Killen, 2007). However, discussions of ¨student-centredness¨ often read as if it is a simple, off-the-shelf pedagogical alternative to traditional teaching in didactic disciplines; as if any given teacher may simply alter their approach to instructional design and the student will become ¨active¨, regardless of what is being learned or how. 
This treatment of the concept ignores the realities of the classroom and the complexities of the teaching task, as well as the importance of the role of content for disciplines such as engineering. It also undermines the importance and expertise of the teacher, which is increased rather than decreased when student-centredness is the goal. That is not to say, however, that student-centredness should not be an important aspiration for individual teachers, and for engineering education as a whole. Rather, we require a more sophisticated understanding of the skills and circumstances that can bring it to life. This is necessary if engineering teachers are to be supported in pursuing this principle in their practice. 

Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 2:30pm - 2:45pm
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

2:45pm

| 5A | Students Perspectives on Design Based Learning in Undergraduate Engineering Studies
In engineering education, learning and teaching is delivered and assessed based on student learning outcomes. Student learning outcomes are basically matched with graduate learning outcomes (GLOs) at Deakin University. Deakin Graduate learning outcomes describe the knowledge and capabilities that graduates should acquired and able to demonstrate in their future career. This study aims to analyse the views of the cohort of students about design based learning from third and fourth year undergraduate civil engineering. Design based learning is used as one of learning and teaching process at Deakin in the School of Engineering. The design based learning (DBL) process helps students to be self directed leaners which enhances the student learning outcomes towards attaining graduate career expected skills.


Tuesday December 8, 2015 2:45pm - 2:50pm
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

2:45pm

| 5A | Quick Start to First Year Student Motivation and Better Employability
Student motivation in first year engineering is often low and this impedes learning and employability. The literature reports superior motivation in mature age students and we started wondering how to help the straight high school graduate leave behind the “High School mentality” more quickly and move to the motivation seen in mature age students. Mature age students are reported to have goals which drive them along and so we started searching for what goals might drive a recent high School graduate.

Speakers

Tuesday December 8, 2015 2:45pm - 3:00pm
Rincon Room RACV Torquay map C3

2:45pm

| 5C | Discussion session
Speakers
avatar for Ben Horan

Ben Horan

Senior Lecturer, Deakin University
Dr Horan led the design and development of the CAVE and Virtual Reality Facility within the Centre for Advanced Design and Engineering Training (CADET) at Deakin University. Ben is leading the CADET VR Lab and the Head of Discipline for Mechatronics within the School of Engineering at Deakin University. | Dr Horan has been awarded an Endeavour Research Fellowship, Australian Academy of Science – Australia Korea Foundation Early Career... Read More →


Tuesday December 8, 2015 2:45pm - 3:10pm
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

2:45pm

3:00pm

3:10pm

3:30pm

| 6C | Workshop: Exploring Questions of Sequence in Engineering Curricula
An Australian Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) program needs to meet Engineers Australia’ sixteen expected outcomes and the Australian Qualifications Framework’s 11 Learning Outcome Descriptors. In addition, universities may aim to incorporate the CDIO’s Syllabus, the university’s own graduate attributes etc.

The volume and range of expected outcomes pose a challenge in ensuring a coherent engineering curricula. Capodagli and Jackson (2001, page 259) described a risk of such a crowded curriculum as contributing to a 'spray and pray' approach - spraying on the training and praying it sticks. Faust and Miner (1986) noted that without theory, categories proliferate, and any a-theoretical system will eventually fall of its own weight as will classification systems that are based on inadequate theory.

What are the theories and metaphors guiding sequence in engineering curricula? 

In this workshop we aim to leverage the contributions of a group of engineering educators to explore the tensions and possibilities of a ‘blank slate’ approach to the design of a Bachelor of Engineering (Honours). We bring to the table key milestones along an optimal learning trajectory, and ask AAEE participants to help locate expected outcomes and processes optimally placed in the beginning, the middle or the end of the four years of a Bachelor of Engineering (Honours).


Tuesday December 8, 2015 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Zeally Room RACV Torquay map C5

3:30pm

| 6D | Workshop: RALfie – Remote Access Laboratories for Fun, Innovation and Education
A lack of high school graduates with sufficient Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) skill has been identified as a challenge for continuing economic development in many countries around the world. No enough children developing an interest in STEM topics. In particular in Australia, student engagement and participation rates in STEM in secondary schools are low. Laboratory activities play an important role in science and engineering education and many projects have made laboratory activities available online. Some of the major initiatives include iLab, Labshare and VISIR. Most activities are developed and hosted by Universities and used for undergraduate teaching. More recently remote laboratories have also been proposed in the context of school education. Traditionally, remote laboratories are hosted in centralized locations and experiments are built by experts and used by students. However, this does not reflect the way experimental learning is traditionally used in schools. Here setting up the experiment and building the apparatus or rig from an important part of the learning activity. An alternative to the traditional, centralized approach are peer-to-peer remote access laboratories were the experiments are designed, build and hosted in a distributed manner by students. In such an environment students are provided with the necessary tools to conceive, design and build experiments. Those are shared with others who run the activities remotely. Both the maker-experience as well as the user-experience are important learning activities. To make a system like this possible a number of challenges need to be addressed.

Speakers
avatar for Alexander Kist

Alexander Kist

School Coordinator (Learning & Teaching), USQ


Tuesday December 8, 2015 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Bells Room RACV Torquay map C5

3:30pm

3:30pm

4:30pm

Free time
Tuesday December 8, 2015 4:30pm - 5:45pm
TBA

5:45pm

6:00pm

10:00pm

Bus return to hotels
Tuesday December 8, 2015 10:00pm - 11:30pm
TBA
 
Wednesday, December 9
 

8:45am

Bus to CADET
Wednesday December 9, 2015 8:45am - 9:15am
TBA

9:00am

Registration desk opens
All delegates must be registered in order to attend AAEE2015 conference. The registration desk will be located in the Great Ocean Road Foyer of the venue.

Wednesday December 9, 2015 9:00am - 9:15am
CADET (KE) Foyer DEAKIN UNIVERISTY

9:30am

Welcome and Housekeeping
Speakers
avatar for Assoc. Prof. Aman Than Oo

Assoc. Prof. Aman Than Oo

Associate Hos (Teaching & Learning) | Faculty of Science Engineering & Built Environment | School of Engineering | Deakin Univeristy


Wednesday December 9, 2015 9:30am - 9:35am
CADET (KE) Lecture Theatre DEAKIN UNIVERISTY

9:35am

9:45am

Keynote Address
PRESENTATION:
Knowledge exchange:
Building a collaborative partnership.
The North East of England is seen as UK's industrial Powerhouse. The region is home to large international companies including Nissan, Hitachi Rail, Technip Umbilical and several pharmaceutical manufacturers, all which are showing investment and growth within advanced manufacturing and services directly in support of manufacturing.
It was recently announced that a new international advanced manufacturing park will be built next to Nissan.

The proposed park would be in the region of 150 hectares, providing over 6000 jobs and will build on the region’s advanced manufacturing heritage. To support growth and innovation in manufacturing in the region, Sunderland Universityhas created a brand which is recognised by local companies as the key partner to support the development of skills, product design and development and new manufacturing initiatives.

David’s presentation will highlight how the Institute for Automotive Manufacturing and Advanced Practice (AMAP), at the University of Sunderland, supports local companies by creating problem-solving solutions through strong industry and academic knowledge exchange partnerships. A case study will be presented to highlight the approach used by AMAP to generate interest from industry.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Dr David Baglee

Dr David Baglee

Senior Lecturer, University of Sunderland, UK
David Baglee gained his PhD from the University of Sunderland in 2005. He is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Sunderland UK, a Visiting Professor of Operations and Maintenance at the University of Lulea, Sweden and a Visiting associate Research Professor at the University of Maryland USA. His research interests include the use of advanced maintenance techniques and technologies to support advanced manufacturing practices within a range of... Read More →


Wednesday December 9, 2015 9:45am - 10:30am
CADET (KE) Lecture Theatre DEAKIN UNIVERISTY

10:30am

Morning tea
Wednesday December 9, 2015 10:30am - 11:00am
CADET (KE) Foyer DEAKIN UNIVERISTY

10:30am

Tours: High Voltage Lab
Wednesday December 9, 2015 10:30am - 1:30pm
High Voltage Lab DEAKIN UNIVERISTY

10:30am

Tours: Virtual Reality Lab
The CADET VR Laboratory is an advanced
research facility focused on highly
immersive large‐scale virtual reality (VR).
The laboratory is working with a number
of partners on research projects focused
on lowering the barrier to VR and solving

Wednesday December 9, 2015 10:30am - 1:30pm
Virtual Reality Lab DEAKIN UNIVERISTY

11:00am

11:00am

| 2 | Masterclass: CDIO in the Australian and New Zealand Context
This workshop is co-authored by Duncan Campbell (QUT), Nicolete Maynard (Curtin), Natalie Lloyd (Curtin) and Veronica Mier del Rosal (Universidad de Oviedo, Spain). Duncan and Natalie are facilitating in person, and Nicoleta and Veronica engaging from afar.

CDIO (Conceive, Design, Implement and Operate) is a global initiative with 126 member universities and insititutes around the world, including seven in the Australian and New Zealand Region. CDIO is an active community of practice which shares tools and innovation in engineering education. In recent years, the CDIO initiative has revised the "CDIO Syllabus" and the 12 CDIO Standards placing greater emphasis in a number of areas including leadership, entrepreneurship, sustainability, internationalisation and mobility. Member insitututions engage CDIO in many ways which include improving their own engineering programs, to share their own experiences, to benchmark against other institutions, to acheive accreditation, and to assist in student mobility. AAEE was the first Affiliate Member of CDIO. The communities and aims of both the AAEE community and the CDIO community have much in common. This workshop is to explore how we can leverage opportunities with the AAEE and CDIO communities.

Speakers
avatar for Duncan Campbell

Duncan Campbell

Professor, QUT
I am the Chair of the ANZ CDIO Region and former President of AAEE. I am also the Director Australian Research Center for Aerospace Automation (ARCAA) which puts me at the intriguing nexus of research and engineering education. I am driven by how we can leverage the greatest opportunities between our AAEE community and the global CDIO community. Very happy to have a discussion around this (and other topics of course).



Wednesday December 9, 2015 11:00am - 12:30pm
KE2.202 DEAKIN UNIVERISTY

11:00am

A Panel of Dangerous Ideas
Educational leaders and thinkers will share their insights about STEM, the digital environment, impact and risk with respect to education for today and into the future. Essentially a discussion on what matters most in education.

Speakers
avatar for Prof. David Lowe

Prof. David Lowe

Associate Dean (Education), The University of Sydney
Curriculum Innovation; | Linking technical + professional development; | Remote Laboratories


Wednesday December 9, 2015 11:00am - 12:30pm
CADET (KE) Lecture Theatre DEAKIN UNIVERISTY

12:30pm

1:00pm

Lunch
Wednesday December 9, 2015 1:00pm - 1:30pm
CADET (KE) Foyer DEAKIN UNIVERISTY

1:30pm

3:00pm

Free time/Golf
Register to play at the RACV reception desk.

Wednesday December 9, 2015 3:00pm - 6:00pm
RACV RECEPTION